Cuenca High Life logo

Cuenca News

Immigration office is moving back to Cuenca thanks to efforts of Azuay Prefect Yaku Pérez

Following meetings with national officials in Quito, Azuay Prefect Yaku Pérez announced Tuesday that all immigration functions for Azuay Province citizens and residents will return to Cuenca. Most immigration functions were relocated to Azogues, in neighboring Cañar Province, in 2015.

Azuay Province Prefect Yaku Pérez flanked by Vice Minister of Human Mobility Santiago Chávez and Undersecretary of Foreign Affairs Raúl Abad.

“We have a population of more than 800,000 in Cuenca and Azuay and it makes no sense for the migration office to be located in another province,” Pérez says. “Thousands of our residents travel internationally every year and they deserve the convenience of having the functions they require close by.”

Ecuador’s Vice Minister of Human Mobility, Santiago Chávez and Undersecretary of the Foreign Ministry Raúl Abad agreed with Pérez and said the move would take place as soon as possible but did not provide a date.

When the foreign ministry closed Cuenca’s immigration office on Calle Alfonso Cordero, relocating it to Azogues, officials said the move was intended to save money and consolidate immigration functions at the regional data center in Cañar Province.

22 thoughts on “Immigration office is moving back to Cuenca thanks to efforts of Azuay Prefect Yaku Pérez

  1. When you err the respectful thing to do is correct the error upon discovery, hence, a good act by this government.

  2. Azogues is the absolute worst place in Ecuador to get any immigration activity done. You are much better off getting everything done in the US before you move here if you can. Or traveling to Quito or Guayaquil. If the same employees from Azogues come to Cuenca stay away if you can!

    1. I have been to Azogues office for 2 years, and I have NEVER had a problem with the workers there.
      Maybe they say I need something else to bring back cause they changed the law again, but that isn’t there fault.
      They are just doing their job !
      I don’t know what issues you have with them, but I’m sure there will be new people if it isn’t feasible to travel back and forth to Cuenca everyday for work.

    2. I have been to Azogues office for 2 years, and I have NEVER had a problem with the workers there.
      Maybe they say I need something else to bring back cause they changed the law again, but that isn’t there fault.
      They are just doing their job !
      I don’t know what issues you have with them, but I’m sure there will be new people if it isn’t feasible to travel back and forth to Cuenca everyday for work.

    3. It’s not so bad. They just don’t want to send applications with errors or shortcomings to the office in Quito. You don’t need to do everything in the USA. If you know what you need, you can prepare your documents in your home country and easily submit the application in Azogues.

      1. As my wife and I did. No problems whatsoever. Of course it helps to have an hones efficient lawyer in Cuenca taking care of the papers work before you come in. But by the time we landed in Guayaquil our lawyer Dra. Lina Ulloa had everything in order and we had our cedulas in a matter of few weeks.

    4. It is great sme have had no issue. I had a nightmare. I had to go there 11 times. When I arrived in Cuenca in 2015, I had every single document needed, with apostile. Yet at the Azogues office they kept requiring more documents. Each time cost me about $500 to obtain. None were due to law changes, although the law did change for me causing all fees to double because of the delays! After SEVEN months, and those 11 trips, along with a required trip to Peru due to their delays, I eventually got the visa. And what about all those extra documents? Not a single one was actually needed, and they were all handed back to me. All of this as a direct result of the people in the Azogues office, not any of it due to law changes. To this day, I am still bitter about the way I was treated. In the end, it ended up costing me over $3000 and a lot of sleepless nights. The worse part… not a single person gave a sh#t. No one cared. As far as my experience, the Azogues office and all their people could vanish from the earth and it would be a blessing to all those that need services. By the way… I had to keep getting new passport photos nearly every time I went or they wouldn’t talk to me! I left and got them, returned, only to be told about new documents needed. grrrr

  3. Hopefully this move will include increased staffing to accommodate the demand and eliminate long wait times for appointments.
    All in all – good news.

  4. It figures it took so long for this to change that I’m about finished, but I’m so happy for the people here in Cuenca so they don’t have to pay so much money traveling back and forth to Azogues.
    Great Deal !

      1. I totally agree. I’m going to add up our trips, etc and I know it won’t be a reasonable price back and forth all the time, but it is what it is. I’m just so glad it’s over.

  5. They asked people to produced apostilled birth certificates, which the law didn’t require. That was unconscionable. I did my visa in Guayaquil without the birth certificate. Took all of 15 minutes at the counter. Two months later, I got an email saying my visa was ready. I had all the documents required under the law, and the Guayaquil office didn’t demand anything else. I’m happy to learn the Azogues office is closing. The stories I’ve heard of how my friends were treated were sad and sometimes shocking.

  6. It was so much fun traveling to Azogues. The lovely bus ride. The lunches at the bus station. I will miss those days.

    1. The bus station cafeteria looked so clean. I ate there, and was sick for a week. I avoided it after that!

  7. They asked people to produced apostilled birth certificates, which the law didn’t require. That was unconscionable. I did my visa in Guayaquil without the birth certificate. Took all of 15 minutes at the counter. Two months later, I got an email saying my visa was ready. I had all the documents required under the law, and the Guayaquil office didn’t demand anything else. I’m happy to learn the Azogues office is closing. The stories I’ve heard of how my friends were treated were sad and sometimes shocking.

    1. A birth certificate has never been required for a VISA. It is required for the Cedula except for children under the age of 18 then the birth certificate is part of their application.

Comments are closed.