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It´s brother vs. brother as Fabricio Correa again threatens to run against Rafael in the next presidential election

One of the hemisphere’s fiercest sibling rivalries might get played out on a national stage. Fabricio Correa — the older brother of Ecuadoran President Rafael Correa — said he would challenge him at the ballot box in 2012 unless a more viable opposition candidate came along. Fabricio first suggested the possibility of a presidental run last summer […]

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DINING WITH DEKECuencano lunch in a German bar with American music

The mid-day repast in Cuenca, typical of Latin America, is a big meal and a big deal. It’s long, starting as early as 11:00 and continuing till as late as 4:00, and many shops, stores, offices, and museums close between 1:00 and 3:00 for the leisurely lunch. And you can dine out in a range of restaurants, from no-name […]

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CUENCA DIGESTMotor vehicles generate most of Cuenca´s air pollution

A survey by Cuenca´s Vehicular Technology Review committee reports what most Cuencanos already know: that most of the city´s air pollution is the result of bus, car and truck exhaust. The survey found that 85% to 90% of pollution is caused by the city´s 80,000 vehicles. According to Rolando Arpi, director of the survey, Cuenca […]

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DINING WITH DEKEWhen it´s time to splurge, you can get fancy at Goda

[Editor's Note: This is the debut restaurant review from Deke Castleman, who spent a month in Cuenca recently and delved deeply into the dining environment. Deke'll be the new food dude at CuencaHighLife, but we encourage anyone and everyone with a dining tip, restaurant review, market story — any Cuenca or Ecuador food experience worth recounting — […]

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ACCESS CUENCAA travel guide is in the works

[Editor’s Note: The following starts a new series of posts from veteran travel writer Deke Castleman and photographer Shirlee Severs. The blog of Deke and Shirlee’s first two weeks in Ecuador ran on this website in April. This series covers the month they spent in Cuenca last October.] In February 2010, Shirlee and I took […]

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Gringo, go home!! An expat pays a visit to the homeland

Editor´s note: Edd Staton is a Cuenca resident, writer and community activist. He is author of the Edd Said blog, www.eddsaid.blogspot.com, and writes a column for Cuenca´s afternoon newspaper, La Tarde. I am back in the U.S. with my wife for the first time in seven months. We plan to spend five weeks visiting family and […]

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Reliable insurance is available for foreign residents in Ecuador despite reports to the contrary

Rosa Vintimilla, president of Roviza, S.A., one of Cuenca´s largest and oldest insurance agencies, says that misunderstandings among both foreign residents and citizens keep many Ecuadorians uninsured. “One thing I hear is that good, reliable insurance is not available and this is simply not true,” she says. "There are many companies, including companies from the U.S. and Europe, offering […]

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Census rules remain confusing as officials continue to work on details; here´s the official government statement

Confusion continues to reign regarding the rules for Sunday´s national census, in part because Ecuador´s census officials are still tinkering with the details. The government´s mandate that citizens, residents and tourists remain in their homes and hotels during the count is common prcatice in Latin America as well as in countries in Asia and Africa. Government officials say it […]

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CUENCA DIGESTCuenca escapes floods but rain fills local rivers

Cuenca escaped the heavy rains that caused floods in Colombia and northern Ecaudor but has received enough to replenish the city´s rivers and fill the downstream reservoirs that generate most of the country´s electricity. Before the rains began two weeks ago, breaking a three-month drought, some officials were predicting a repeat of the severe drought of […]

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Although democracy has made great strides in Latin America, the road to change remains a rough ride

Democracy has taken root in Latin America, but remains fragile three decades since coup-imposed military regimes were replaced by freely elected governments, a new U.N. report warns. It says drug violence, weak states with corrupt police and inefficient courts, and wealth concentrated in few hands threaten representative government across the region. "There is a problem […]

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