Health News

By Kate Murphy “You’re not listening!” “Let me finish!” “That’s not what I said!” After “I love you,” these are among the most common refrains in close relationships. During my two years researching a book on listening, I learned something incredibly ironic about interpersonal communication: The closer we feel toward someone, the less likely we are...
By Dani Blum As summer approaches, many people with spring allergies are still suffering. And as new Covid variants circulate, experts say we may also soon see an uptick in cases. (Though wastewater data suggests that Covid cases are currently fairly low.) It can be tricky to distinguish between seasonal allergy symptoms, early signs of the coronavirus or just a...
By Mark Travers Cultural, religious and societal norms have long painted masturbation as a shameful or immoral act, leading many individuals to feel guilt or embarrassment about engaging in it. This stigma, especially harsh for women, is deeply rooted in historical misconceptions and misinformation that cast self-pleasure in a negative light. However, solo-sex is a natural and healthy...
By Cecilia Nowell Candy lines every inch of the mercado de dulces in Mexico City’s historic center. Tantalizing strawberry-flavored chocolates and Tajín-covered mango gummies pack the narrow aisles of the meandering marketplace. But many of the colorful packages are somewhat dampened by black stop signs printed on their fronts. Alongside dreamy descriptions of creamy and chocolatey confections, the stop...
By Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Staff We are all aware of the dangers of pollution to our air, water, and Earth. In a letter recently published in Nature Human Behavior, scientists are advocating for the recognition and mitigation of another type of environmental pollution that poses equivalent personal and societal dangers: information overload. With the internet at our...
By Jennifer Abbasi A poor diet now outranks smoking as the leading cause of death globally and in the United States, according to the latest data. Yet a recent systematic review of studies suggests that medical students in countries around the world haven’t been getting the education they need to counsel patients on healthy eating. Why This Matters It’s possible...
By Madeline Holcombe Eating ultraprocessed foods is associated with an early risk of death, according to a 30-year study — but different foods have different impacts. Processed meats and sugary foods and drinks aren’t correlated with the same risks as ultraprocessed whole grains, for example, said lead study author Dr. Mingyang Song, associate professor of...
By Dana G. Smith According to some estimates, consumers spend $62 billion a year on “anti-aging” treatments. But while creams, hair dyes and Botox can give the impression of youth, none of them can roll back the hands of time. Scientists are working to understand the biological causes of aging in the hope of one...
By Eduardo Cuevas and Karen Weintraub More than a year after catching COVID-19, Sawyer Blatz still can’t practice his weekly rituals: running for miles in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park or biking around his adopted hometown. In many ways, the pandemic isn’t over for the 27-year-old and millions of other Americans. It may never be. They...
By Roni Caryn Rabin Surgeons in Boston have transplanted a kidney from a genetically engineered pig into an ailing 62-year-old man, the first procedure of its kind. If successful, the breakthrough offers hope to hundreds of thousands of Americans whose kidneys have failed. So far, the signs are promising. Kidneys remove waste products and excess fluid...
By David Leonhardt Much of the world has decided that most young children do not need to receive Covid booster shots. It’s true in Britain, France, Japan, Australia and many other countries. Some countries, like India, have gone further. They say that otherwise healthy children do not need even an initial Covid vaccination. In Germany,...
By Sydney Lupkin Sparks flew on Capitol Hill Thursday as the CEOs of three drug companies faced questions from the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions about why drug prices are so much higher in the United States than they are in the rest of the world. The executives from Bristol Myers Squibb,...

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The Cuenca Dispatch

Week of June 16

Noboa’s Government Moves to End Fuel Gasoline Subsidies, Highlighting Inequities for Low-Income Groups.

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Cuenca-Girón-Pasaje Road to Temporarily Close for Pipeline Replacement.

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Ecuador to Initiate Construction of $52 Million ‘Bukele-Style’ Prison to Combat Organized Crime.

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