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CUENCA DIGESTLAN-Ecuador begins Cuenca service on Monday, May 18

LAN Ecuador has announced that it will begin Cuenca – Guayaquil air service Monday, May 18. The first flight will leave Guayaquil at 12:05 p.m. and arrive in Cuenca at 12:40 p.m. In addition to general travelers, the inaugural flight will transport Lan officials, politicians and journalists. The return Cuenca to Guayaquil flight leaves at 1:25 p.m., arriving in Guayaquil at 2.

LAN officials say the response to Cuenca air service has been strong and says it will offer a promotional one-way fare of $28 through late June. In August, LAN says it will add a Cuenca to Quito flight.

LAN’s Cuenca routes will be serviced by the airline's Air Bus 318, with a capacity of 120 passengers.

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NO SMOKING WEEK FEATURES A FULL AGENDA IN CUENCA

The Azuay Department of Health is planning a full program of events in Cuenca leading up to “No Smoking Day,” May 31.

Beginning at 9 a.m. on Saturday, May 23, the health department and its partners will conduct a series of lectures and workshop on the negative health effects of smoking. On Sunday, May 24, a “Walk for Health” begins at 8:30 a.m. in Parque de la Madre. The walk will cover almost 10,000 meters, passing the Primero de Mayo stadium and returning to Parque de la Madre.

On Thursday, May 28, at 9:30, local school children will parade through the city, beginning at the San Blas church and finishing at City Hall, where University of Cuenca medical faculty will present awards to businesses and public institutions that have established smoke-free spaces.

 

CITY'S RECYLING PROGRAM NEEDS MORE SUPPORT FROM THE PUBLIC

Although Cuenca’s municipal recycling program has been operational for more than a year, officials say they need more help from the public to make it effective.

Diana Jara, an official with the recycling program says the main problem is the mixing of organic and inorganic waste. “The puts a huge strain on the system and makes the work difficult for employees who must sort the waste by hand.” The seven sorters at the recycle center are forced to separate plastics, papers and metal from animal carcasses and food products, according to Jara. She also says the public needs to uunderstand that used disposable baby diapers and toilet paper need to be put with organic waste.

“One concern is for the health of our recycling workers,” said Jara. “An educated public will make their job easier.” She adds that the program is providing information it believes will help, including lectures to local school children.