Opinions

Lenin Moreno appears poised to buck the Latin American trend of leftist governments going down to defeat

By Greg Grandin

On April 2, Ecuador will hold its runoff presidential ballot, the first major Latin America election since Donald Trump’s unexpected November victory.

Polls could be wrong, but so far all but one of them indicate that Ecuador’s next president will be wheelchair-bound Lenín Moreno, who is promising to continue the progressive agenda of the country’s outgoing leader, Rafael Correa. It’s good news, indicating that the Trump effect might rebound in favor of the Latin American left, halting an emboldened neoliberal right, which now rules in Brazil and Argentina.

There was a moment less than a decade ago, at the crest of the region’s “pink tide,” when Latin America was governed by representatives of each of its historic left-wing traditions: a trade unionist in Brazil, a liberation theologian in Paraguay, a Peronist in Argentina, a Keynesian economist in Ecuador, a feminist medical doctor in Chile, a (former) urban guerrilla Marxist in Uruguay, an indigenous-rights peasant activist in Bolivia (whose mentor was a Trotskyist miner), a nationalist in Honduras, and a military left populist in Venezuela. Nearly the full left spectrum, especially if we were to be generous and include Cuban Stalinists.

Lenin Moreno and his wife campaigning in Quito.

When Barack Obama won the US presidency in 2008, Latin America’s leaders tried to welcome him into the pantheon, imagining his victory as fulfilling the legacy of the US civil-rights movement and completing the picture of the Americas ruled by a heterodox left. The Obama administration, however, demurred, letting Hillary Clinton at State maneuver to isolate Venezuela (including pushing for the privatization of Mexico’s petroleum industry, aimed at weakening Hugo Chávez’s successful, until his death in 2013 at least, repoliticization of oil) and legitimizing coups in Paraguay, Honduras, and, most recently, Brazil.

Mark Weisbrot, in The Nation, recently summed up the many successes of the outgoing Correa administration. Quito weathered the sharp downturn in the price of oil a bit battered but still better than did Caracas, with many of the social gains achieved during the boom intact. If Lenín Moreno wins in April, he will help break the right’s momentum. The region’s next big elections take place in Chile, in November of this year, and Mexico, in July 2018, and anti-Trump leftist outsiders are in the running, so far.

And if Moreno does best his conservative rival, as polls are saying he will by more than 10 points, a new type will be added to the progressive pantheon: Moreno, who lost the use of his legs in 1998 when he was shot in the back in a Quito carjacking, is a disability-rights activist. According to PRI:

“In 2006, Moreno was elected vice president. At the time it was rare to see people in wheelchairs in public. In rural areas, people with severe handicaps were treated as outcasts and sometimes confined to sheds and chicken coops.

“But Moreno has tried to change all that. Wheelchair ramps are springing up across Ecuador. People with severe disabilities now receive $300 monthly stipends from the government. And Moreno helped draw up a law that compels Ecuadorian companies to set aside at least 4 percent of jobs for people with disabilities.

“In a recent speech, he pledged that the government would reach out to all disabled people who need help. That, he said, amounts to a revolution.

“That revolution includes providing free artificial limbs to poor Ecuadorians. Some are being built in a wing of this state-run hospital in Quito. Government officials say the program is the only one of its kind in Latin America.

“The Guardian reported that while Moreno served as Correa’s vice president, Ecuador has become one of the most progressive nations in Latin America when it comes to providing financial, technical and professional assistance to people with disabilities.

“State spending on related fields has increased from $2m a year to $150m (£97m). Tests are carried out on newborns to ensure that care is provided early, and all leading employers in Ecuador must earmark at least 4% of their jobs for disabled people.

“Government figures note that 197,435 physically disabled people have received treatment, 430,289 have been provided with wheelchairs, special mattresses, canes, diapers or other materials, 17,876 have been given hearing aids, about 4,000 have been provided with prosthetic limbs (now manufactured in Ecuador).

“There are also programmes to provide braille texts and computers for visually impaired people.”

Once again, Latin America leads the way. As US progressives continue to fight over how to interpret the 2016 elections, Ecuadorians show how to create a decidedly anti-neoliberal intersectional coalition (see this report on why the country’s Ecuadorean Federation of LGBTI Organizations is supporting Moreno). And, as anybody with a heart in the United States is gearing up to fight a budget that promises to cut Meals-on-Wheels and medical-research funding, Ecuador is about to elect a president who manages to invoke the promise of both FDR and the Russian Revolution. Moreno was born on March 19, 1953, just 14 days after the death of Joseph Stalin, which might explain why his parents named him Lenín, to honor the original promise of a lost revolution.

Lenín’s second name is—wait for it—Voltaire. Latin America, still waving the ragged red flag of the radical Enlightenment. Similar to Hugo Chávez’s father, Moreno’s dad was a rural public-school teacher, a profession that continues to embody the best of Latin America’s everyday socialism (the 43 Mexican student activists who were disappeared over two years ago were training to be rural teachers), placing the common public good over private plunder.

If Donald Trump is almost the platonic ideal of plunder, Lenín Voltaire Moreno might just become the standard-bearer of a revived public. Where Trump apparently can’t ever express pleasure, apart from that which he takes from domination, Moreno’s whole being practically vibrates Beethoven’s “Ode to Joy.” He credits learning how to laugh with helping him recover from the trauma of losing the use of his legs, and he’s authored a number of books on the therapeutic benefits of fun, including The Theory and Practice of Humor.

 “We like to laugh at power,” Lenín writes, “and we use humor to ridicule the pretentious, and the politicians who trick us.” In these dark days, he could be just the Lenin we need.

___________________

Credit: The Nation, www.thenation.com

  • jerrynellen

    Biased opinion as opposed to reporting. Aren’t polls indicating the opposite, or am I mistaken?

    • Marco Rodríguez

      You ARE mistaken

    • Ellis Nelson

      Opinions are, by definition, biased. The article says it’s “opinion.”

      There are four polls that I have seen. Three of them give Moreno a large lead. One gives Lasso a 2 point lead.

    • Jason Faulkner

      It’s an editorial

    • nards barley

      The Nation is a far leftist rag. I wouldn’t heed a word.

      • StillWatching

        Far leftist? Nah. Leftist, for sure.

    • StillWatching

      Neither jerry nor nellen (sorry, I can’t pander to that jerrynellen crap) get out much nor read well. As others have railed, the piece is clearly labeled opinion and others have accurately clarified the current poll results. At this point, to me anyway, it looks like faulkner will finally have a correct prediction; Moreno will win the election.

  • mches56

    I may be simple minded, but it is my opinion that, socialism can be simply defined as taking money from one person, and then giving that money to some other person. It is also my opinion that USA Obamacare did just that. Obamacare took my money and gave it to someone else.

    During the year 2016, as a USA citizen, Obamacare required that I pay $14,200 per year for my health insurance premiums for myself and for my wife. And on top of that, my wife and I had an $8000 out-of-pocket deductible that had to be paid, before the insurance would kick-in and pay for any MD or hospital expense. Add those two numbers and you get a cost of $22,200 for one years healthcare insurance expense. And that was taken from a yearly salary of approximately $32,000, which included benefits. That was my Socialistic Obamacare experience and a big reason why I live in Cuenca, Ecuador today. Obamacare, in the USA, for two USA expats, was incredibly expensive. Why live in the USA, where Obamacare forced me to pay for some other person’s health problems and forced me to pay nearly one-third of the yearly salary for the insurance premium alone? Where did that $14,200 insurance premium go? I assume the money went to the insurance company and also to someone else, because my wife and I never went to see the MD. We couldn’t afford to go see the MD, it was just too expensive. Socialism is great when you are on the receiving end of the deal, but when you are forced to be on the paying end of the deal, for this USA expat couple, it was outrageously expensive.

    • wrikar

      Obamacare was not a socialist system, it was a windfall for the capitalist insurance companies.

    • Miguel Vladimir Romero

      Health care in the USA is big , big business just like Education is big business too , great country but something is wrong when you go to the ER make you wait then give you some pills send you home and then they bill your insurance 27000 dollars for what? How they justify that the same for education it’s OK to make a profit but these is highway robbery !! And if you complaint o try to fix these abuses they call you socialist!!! Go figure that , anyway Ecuador is a progressive country trying to do the right , welcome and try to enjoy your retirement

    • Tom Adams

      That is not only sad but is criminal in nature! The U.S. Founders are turning over in their graves! Sorry you had to go through that mchesss56
      :/

    • Jason Faulkner

      Yes, you’re simpleminded.

  • Jason Faulkner

    I’m curious how this “rolling back of the left” narrative keeps going. In the middle of this so-called trend, Chile elected a socialist and Evo remains as popular as ever. Lugo and Dilma were removed by parliamentary coups, not popular sentiment. Zelaya was hastily secreted away at gunpoint in his pajamas and leftist candidates were barred from running. It’s interesting to notice how the right wing in Latin America sees removal by force as some sort of political victory.

  • Glenn P Hebert

    For a progressive paper, I find it funny that the reporter uses “wheelchair-bound.” The proper term would be “who uses a wheelchair,” which puts the emphasis on the person. “Wheelchair-bound” puts the emphasis on the wheelchair.

    I usually don’t put much stock in PC speech. I don’t care if people call me disabled, handicapped, gimp, or crippled. But, come on, an “enlightened” paper using such a term?

    • wonderin’ wally

      Mr. Hebert, as a non-pc gimp myself, I’m wondering what you find so offensive about using wheelchair-bound in this article?

      I’m wheelchair bound and you can call me anything you want except late for dinner.

      • Glenn P Hebert

        I didn’t find offensive. I found it funny. I’ve been told by other people with disabilities that one should use “people first” language (i.e., “the woman has a disability” instead of “the disabled woman”.) Wikipedia says “The Nation” is the mostly widely read weekly journal of

        liberal/progressive political and cultural news…. Since progressives tend to use PC language, I just found it amusing (maybe “funny” gave the wrong connotation) the reporter didn’t use PC language in this case. Mine were simply tongue-in-cheek comments meant to amuse.

        I see you’re not the only one who took my comments seriously. Guess that’s why I’ll never make a living as a comedy writer, eh?

        • Wally

          Actually, Glen, I appreciate the time you took to respond. I’m just curious about what people think and why. Thanks for that.

          Personally, I eschew PC speech and don’t pander to those that insist on it. In fact, I rather enjoy rubbing them the wrong way.

          I was unaware of what you wrote about this convention of “people first” phraseology and find it laughable that they now have formal conventions for PC speech.

          See, Glen? You did give me a laugh.

    • Tamara

      “Progressive paper”?????

      • Glenn P Hebert

        Yes, according to Wikipedia. I’ve never read it myself.

    • Jason Faulkner

      This is the kind of nitpicking Zizek blames for the failure of the progressive movement. I think he’s correct.

      • Glenn P Hebert

        It sounds like you think I’m a liberal nitpicking the article. I’m not. I’m a conservative who was making fun of a liberal magazine. I was attempting to inject a little humor. Not very successfully, judging from the follow-up comments.

        BTW, who is Zizek?

        • Jason Faulkner

          Google is your friend

  • BDev

    The human desire for free stuff (stolen from others) always trumps the human ability to learn from past mistakes.

    • StillWatching

      So it does.

  • Globetrotter

    I cannot understand why so many Americans cannot see the forest for the trees. It must indicate propaganda from birth.

    Health care is free in most countries. It has been for generations. I cannot recall paying for care in my life until I decided reside in Ecuador and had to give up my former national coverage. (Like most countries with health care, any expenditures while traveling abroad used to be reimbursed on my return, unless those costs incurred in the USA.

    Not only does per capita health costs in all other countries come out to much less, we also live longer and at a healthier quality of life. The health difference is sadly visible at a glance wherever Americans appear.

    Obamacare is analogous to a camel. A camel is a horse designed by a committee forced to compromise. In any country but the USA, Obama would merely have copied anyone of the dozens of successful systems in the world. And you all now be living longer, paying less and enjoying life more.

    But to blame Obamacare because you think it is “leftist” or “socialist”, (two terms which have been inexplicably demonized by Americans so as to become incomprehensible there), has obscured the forest.

    • StillWatching

      Julius, I know you struggle with vocabulary, so what I would like you to do first is to go look up the word “spurious” and then I’ll complete my thought.
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Back? Okay, your entire post is full of some of the most spurious reasoning I have ever seen. Coming even from you, it is vapid. When you write: ” Health care is free in most countries. It has been for generations.” it brings to mind the little ditty “Right is right, even if nobody is doing it. Wrong is wrong, even if everybody is doing it”.

      Never mind. Let’s move on to your awful writing. Instead of me being directly didactic, see if you can find the errors in this short excerpt from your post:

      “In any country but the USA, Obama would merely have copied anyone of the dozens of successful systems in the world. And you all now be living longer, paying less and enjoying life more.”

      As for your notion about obamacare, I don’t blame it for anything, but I do blame its architects and promulgator-in-chief for making it crappy. The fact that it is socialistic is only ancillary to its crappiness. Its crappiness stands no matter what label you care to put on it.

    • Jason Faulkner

      They have been indoctrinated from birth to believe that they are “exceptional”, that what works in the rest of the world doesn’t apply to them. The strange thing is, they rarely rank in the top 10 of any indicator that matters, yet they don’t even hesitate to call it the Greatest Country in the World ™.

  • StillWatching

    faulkner seems to be on a first name basis with all of these corrupt socialists except poor ol’ Manuel Zelaya and as far as faulkner’s credibility goes, his representation that “leftist candidates were barred from running [in Honduras] he fails to tell you that Mel Zelaya’s wife, Xiomara Castro de Zelaya, ran for president in 2013 and LOST.

    faulkner is a master at distortion, exaggeration and often, outright lies when he tries to make his points. See if you can pin him down about not only the abject corruption of Chavez, Maduro, Rousseff, Morales, et al, but how these “leaders” took their respective countries to financial ruin pursuing socialism. Don’t even bother asking him about the Castro boys in Cuba.

  • isaac m

    I love how the article compares Lenin to Chavez as if that is an affirmation of his ability to govern. Yeah, Chavez, the guy that died with over 4 billion dollars in his bank account and left his country in complete squalor.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w2S77NltnAw

    • StillWatching

      BIG Amen there, Isaac

  • isaac m
  • Tom Adams

    Greg Grandin, You would do well not to use the subject of this Ecuadorian election to bash the new U.S. President ‘Donald Trump’! He has been in office only two months and already has many achievements. He has more enemies and hate heaped on him even from some in his own party, than any politician ever! Why? Because they see he is working for the people and the established politicians know they are about to lose their life long, very lucrative franchise and special entitlements. If, No-‘when’, Trump succeeds their legalized theft of the treasury at the expense of the citizenry is about to end.. Let’s see if you could complete writing a simple article if you had that much hate directed your way! My bet is you wouldn’t be able to handle it! So think long and hard before you dish it out. ‘Try’ to be a decent human being! Give him time and then you will be able to judge him on the numbers and outward signs of success and satisfaction of U.S. citizens or otherwise; will ultimately define what it is he achieves. Not the unsolicited bloviation from a writer who makes off subject remarks denigrating a U.S. President while composing a commentary that is supposed to be about the 2017 Ecuadorian Presidential race. Don’t exhibit your extreme bias in an inappropriate forum. Please, stay on subject! … Tom A.

  • AAD

    http://www.ecuadorenvivo.com/politica/24-politica/49453-la-polemica-vida-de-lenin-moreno-en-ginebra.html#.WM6vs9QrJiy

    Please read this article (above link), if you are interested in the true opinion Ecuadorians have of Lenin Moreno.
    Other interesting facts about Moreno, common knowledge among Ecuadorians older than 40:

    He is/was a member of a ‘guerrilla’ group here in Ecuador, that is how he wound up in a wheelchair, he was shot during a kidnapping attempt. To this day other members of this group “Alfaro vive carajo” also hold positions of consequence in this government admin. In the CNE, electoral body that delivers election result and controls election process.
    He is not the “cute clown earning millions to tell jokes”, he seems. he is a nightmare to work for an be around, as per close collaborators and as is usually the case with public clowns.

    As for public opinion on the wonderful infrastructure improvements built by the self-proclaimed benefactor of the poorest poor, they don’t hold water, literally. The roads and buildings built by this admin are all damaged by the recent tropical rainstorms throughout Ecuador. Even before the damage by natural causes, many buildings lacked trained personnel, supplies, basic necessities be it hospitals, offices, schools.

    The amount spent by this admin on infrastructure, education, touted as historical in magnitude, is in fact a pittance, as a percentage of the amount they stole during the same period. And then there is of course the little problem of “peculado”, because he received a government salary when he was in fact not a government employee or contractor while living high in Geneva. To the tune of 1.6 million a year. His daughter also received a salary of 7000 a month, just because she could.

    I have asked fellow Ecuadorians who they are voting for. Everyone from friends at the yacht club, taxi drivers, bus riders, fishermen, mercado vendors, cashiers at supermarkets, teachers. People from Quito, Machala, Guayaquil, Cuenca, Riobamba, Ambato, Santa Elena. No one has said they are voting for Moreno. Even people who currently hold a government job, have said they will vote for Lasso, or leave it all blank. I am going to go with my poll.

    • lorenzops

      Thanks, ADHD, for not allowing the urban legend of Moreno’s sordid past fade to oblivion. It serves as fabulous entertainment for those of all ages, not just those over 40.

      And yes, I’m sure you and the taxi drivers down at the yacht club lounge are “all in” for Lasso. I can’t wait to return to those charming, prosperous pre-Correa days.

      And by the way, I heard that your land swindle near La Paz didn’t turn out so well. You have to admit that on rare occasion Ecuador’s legal system gets it right.

      • StillWatching

        And to you, lorenzops, I toss out the same request as I did to AAD. What can you tell me about what seem to be unfounded rumors about the incident that resulted in Moreno being paralyzed. AAD’s account seems to be just as you characterize it; an Urban Legend.

      • AAD

        you are right the attempted swindel by two sleazeball gringos did not go well at all for them. this comment will be saved and printed and added to their file. thanks. so, was it the yatch club comment that got you? too funny. see you all very soon.

      • AAD

        AND, to stay on topic and relate this comment to the article, as the ethical thing to do, i must say that your level of misinformation about me (??) belies your level of misinformation about Ecuador and its politics. caso cerrado.

    • Jason Faulkner

      Sure, and Sandy Hook was staged by Obama to take everyone’s guns away. This is the level of conspiracy theory nonsense that the world has to deal with these days. It’s the only reason Lasso is polling above 20%. Unfortunately, Ecuadorians are no more immune to this nonsense than are the Trump supporters who were convinced Hillary would be going to jail.

      AVC operated between 1983 and 1988. Lenin Moreno was shot in 1998, a full decade later. In that interim period, he was a very public figure and everyone who saw him was pretty sure he was walking. It was a very public event. When a long-time public official, the tourism minister no less, is shot in a robber it makes all the papers. The fourth image in the following link is a picture of Moreno from 1997 with then then Mayor of Quito, Jamil Mahaud (who went on to become president), very much not in a wheelchair.

      http://www.elcomercio.com/galerias/actualidad/imagenes-curiosas-jamil-mahuad.html

      I’m not sure if motivated cognition compelled you to post that nonsense or you’re just a useful idiot easily duped by anything they see on the web, but your post shows the desperation of an opposition looking to another 8 years out of power. Rains damage roads in the Andes? Scandal!! We all remember the days before 2006 when Ecuador’s stellar infrastructure was the envy of the region. Con Lucio no había lluvia.

      Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but not their own facts. Opinions based on lies are no more valid than superstition. No wonder you hide behind a pseudonym. God forbid your neighbors found out you believed in such utter nonsense. It might cause them to question your intelligence.

      On a side note, the image I linked to has been circulated on social media claiming that it was from the Mahuad presidency and that Moreno was a minister in Mahuad’s government (as if you couldn’t just look that up). They also claim that the young lady in the photo is the now President of the National Assembly Gabriela Rivadeneira (it was the then Reina de Quito). AAD probably shared that on his Facebook feed as well along with articles by Emilio Palacio “proving” Correa smuggles cocaine in the presidential plane and that 30S was staged. The Ecuadorian opposition is very much like the diehard Trump supporters. They live in a bubble where claims that can be easily debunked are believed and disseminated among their fellow travelers. They block anyone who points out their lies with verifiable facts until the only friends they have left are more gullible rubes like themselves. Ultimately they believe that all (or even a plurality) of Ecuadorians believe what they believe. Sandy Hook all over again.

      • StillWatching

        Anyone with an ounce of discernment is going to go with faulkner’s account as opposed to AAD’s, and faulkner has certainly painted a true picture of the trump supporters who overlook lies that can easily be identified as such with virtually no effort.

        However, those trumpites are no different than those that bought into the same sort of nonsense from the clinton camp who also bought into and spread those lies among true believers.

        We’ve all seen this in recent history where one of your friends will send you something that is an obvious lie about (fill in the blank) because he knows you will believe it and pass it on to other true believers becase they, too, aren’t seeking truth, only to feed their own scanning biases.

    • StillWatching

      AAD, I’m willing to entertain anyone’s post, even jason faulkner’s, who is usually, but not always, full of crap. I read his posts to see if it is the usual made up nonsense or if he has posted something true and worthwhile. Hell, even in this thread he has posted some things that have merited a thumbs up from me and that is one of the many things that separates me from faulkner; I’m a truth seeker and he is a socialist ideologue.

      In that light, I have read your post and although I have heard this notion before: “He is/was a member of a ‘guerrilla’ group here in Ecuador, that is how he wound up in a wheelchair, he was shot during a kidnapping attempt.” and the implication always is that Moreno was the perpetrator of the kidnap attempt and not the victim.

      However, try as I have, I can’t find a single source that supports this notion and I’m hoping you will provide that for all of us. Hell, even with your notion that you state this way: “Other interesting facts about Moreno, common knowledge among Ecuadorians older than 40:” I can’t find a single Ecuadorian of any age that can corroborate what you claim to be fact. For the record, I work with dozens of Ecuadorians over 40 and I know hundreds more and when I raise this issue with them, they look at me as if I was nuts. It sounds to me like you’re blowing smoke, but I’ll give you the benefit of the doubt; show some proof, please.

      As for your “poll”, all I can do is laugh. I know that’s not polite of me, but I’m a scientist and all you have cited is anecdotal evidence and I am trained to ignore all anecdotal evidence as worthless. One thing I am is a betting man and I seldom bet against the smart money unless I’m given overwhelming odds to do so. On this one I’m betting with faulkner and I say Moreno will be elected president. Care to cover any action on that? We could surely find a third party willing to hold the money. I await your reply.

      • AAD

        you are a scientist and you are asking someone else to do your research for you? that sounds dangerous. in fact you are beginning to seem down right creepy. and completely unable to stay on topic. and the topic is: Lasso is our new president. Ecuadorian’s that is.

        • StillWatching

          Between what you write yourself and faulkner’s dialogue with you, you have proven yourself to be incapable of dealing in facts, logic and reason. Also, you apparently know nothing about the rules of logic. Let me give you one of the most basic rules. It is called Burden of Proof:

          You said that the burden of proof lies not with the person making the claim, but with someone else to disprove.
          The burden of proof lies with someone who is making a claim, and is not upon anyone else to disprove. The inability, or disinclination, to disprove a claim does not render that claim valid, nor give it any credence whatsoever. However it is important to note that we can never be certain of anything, and so we must assign value to any claim based on the available evidence, and to dismiss something on the basis that it hasn’t been proven beyond all doubt is also fallacious reasoning.

          https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/burden-of-proof

          • AAD

            “faulkner” must be having a conversation with themselves; they were blocked, since their first reply to my comments about a year ago. you are too now, due to your inability to stay on topic. i absolutely do not care what kind of scientist you are/were or not and i do not care about what general knowledge you pretend to have. get well, be well. Lasso. Lasso. Lasso. that is the topic at hand. click.

            • Jason Faulkner

              I rest my case

  • Tom Adams

    Greg Grandin, You would do well not to use the subject of this Ecuadorian election to bash the new U.S. President ‘Donald Trump’! He has been in office only two months and already has many achievements. He has more enemies and hateGreg Grandin, You would do well not to use the subject of this Ecuadorian election to bash the new U.S. President ‘Donald Trump’! He has been in office only two months and already has many achievements. He has more enemies and ‘hate’ heaped on him even from some in his own party, ‘than any U.S. politician ever! Why? Because they see he is working for the people and the established politicians know they are about to lose their life-long, very lucrative franchise and special entitlements. If, Trump succeeds; ‘their illegitimate legalized theft of the treasury at the expense of the citizenry is over. This is about to end. *Let’s see if you could complete writing a simple article if you had that much hate directed your way! My bet is you wouldn’t be able to handle it! So think long and hard before you dish it out. ‘Try’ to be a decent human being! Give him time and then you will be able to judge him on the numbers and outward signs of success and satisfaction of U.S. citizens or otherwise; This alone will ultimately define what it is he achieves. Not the unsolicited bloviation from a writer who makes off subject remarks denigrating a U.S. President while composing a commentary that is supposed to be about the 2017 Ecuadorian Presidential race. Don’t exhibit your extreme bias in an inappropriate forum. Please, stay on a subject!
    _____________________________
    *I Responded to the Article above here in Cuenca High Life. This is my second submission! I will keep submitting until my voice is heard. The people’s voice must be heard even if the author disagrees!

  • Tom Adams

    RePost:

    Greg Grandin, You would do well not to use the subject of this Ecuadorian election to bash the new U.S. President ‘Donald Trump’! He has been in office only two months and already has many achievements. He has more enemies and ‘hate’ heaped on him even from some in his own party, ‘than any U.S. politician ever! Why? Because they see he is working for the people and the established politicians know they are about to lose their life-long, very lucrative franchise and special entitlements. If, Trump succeeds; ‘their illegitimate legalized theft of the treasury at the expense of the citizenry is over. This is about to end. *Let’s see if you could complete writing a simple article if you had that much hate directed your way! My bet is you wouldn’t be able to handle it! So think long and hard before you dish it out. ‘Try’ to be a decent human being! Give him time and then you will be able to judge him on the numbers and outward signs of success and satisfaction of U.S. citizens or otherwise; This alone will ultimately define what it is he achieves. Not the unsolicited bloviation from a writer who makes off subject remarks denigrating a U.S. President while composing a commentary that is supposed to be about the 2017 Ecuadorian Presidential race. Don’t exhibit your extreme bias in an inappropriate forum. Please, stay on a subject!
    _____________________________