Expat Life

Misinformed consent? Caveat emptor!

Why are some people so susceptible to quackery?

I was thinking about this recently, when I spied a social media query from a local expat looking for a “natural healer” or “someone in alternative health” who had “some type of machine” that would test her.

I thought, “Test her for what? Is she ill? Does she have unexplained symptoms? Is she dissatisfied with her medical doctor, or maybe she never saw a doctor at all?”

“Some type of machine” is pretty vague. A hair dryer? A glucometer? A glucometer can test your blood sugar, but I don’t think that’s what she meant.

According to the National Council Against Health Fraud, the term “quack” describes a “healer” who boasts about his or her power or products. Quackery describes a health scam that promotes bogus products and services that do not have proven quality or effects.

A quack will offer “special” or “secret formulas” or devices.  He uses case histories and testimonials from “satisfied patients” to prove efficacy, not controlled trials. He’ll create a David and Goliath scenario, defining the “medical establishment” as being in existence purely for profit, claiming that “allopathic” medicine and “Big Pharma” have conspired to persecute him as someone brave enough to reject “modern medicine,” and insist that only by being “natural” can the body truly “heal itself.”

So, what’s a “machine” that might test you?  One used only by “natural healers” or “alternative health practitioners?” I asked a friend who has a background in scientific research if he’d ever heard of such a thing.  He said “oh yes” and linked me to an article published in ScienceBased Medicine.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to “evaluating medical treatments and products of interest to the public in a scientific light.” They describe one machine in particular, for “electro dermal” (or electrodermal) testing, and details how it is purported to work. They write:

“Electrodermal testing is a bogus procedure where measurements of skin conductance with a biofeedback device are entered into a computer to diagnose nonexistent health problems and “energy imbalances” and to recommend treatments for them, often involving the sale of homeopathic remedies and other useless products. It falls under the general category of EAV (Electro Acupuncture of Voll).”

They link to further information from Dr. Steven Barrett of Quackwatch.org:

“The most common use is for prescribing homeopathic products, dietary supplements and herbal products. The devices are also used to determine “allergies”, detect “nutrient deficiencies” and locate alleged problems in teeth that contain amalgam fillings. Some operators claim to tell whether a disease, such as cancer or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, is absent. Some devices are claimed to treat the patient with electromagnetic impulses transmitted into the body or are used to energize products.”

Read more about “electrodiagnostic devices” here.

[By the way, Barrett also explains that these devices are not biofeedback devices. Biofeedback is a helpful technique shown to allow the patient to control some body functions, such as heart rate.

Wikipedia says, “Biofeedback may be used to improve health, performance, and the physiological changes that often occur in conjunction with changes to thoughts, emotions, and behavior. Eventually, these changes may be maintained without the use of extra equipment, for no equipment is necessarily required to practice biofeedback.”]

More bogusness: “Biomeridian Stress Testing” is another term to describe electro acupuncture where the practitioners will use the “tests” to “detect cancer non-invasively” and determine your “unique deficiencies.”

Make an appointment with a “practitioner” who is using the “machine” to evaluate your health, and you’re guaranteed to walk out of the office with hundreds of dollars worth of “necessary supplements” that they’ll insist are vital to bring you back to health.  Don’t we all wish it to be so.

Barrett says that using these devices for diagnostic purposes is very dangerous because “the transmittal of false or misleading health information can cause emotional harm, a false sense of security, or a false set of beliefs that can lead to unwise decisions.” Even “new age” medical doctor Andrew Weil, MD says that relying on the “highly dubious method can be harmful if you have a serious disorder and can delay proper treatment.

Article continues below graphic.

The phrases “complementary therapy” and “alternative therapy” are often used as if they mean the same thing, sometimes combined into one phrase – complementary and alternative therapies (CAMs).

It is not always easy to decide whether something is a complementary or an alternative therapy. But there is an important difference.

A complementary therapy means you can use it alongside your conventional medical treatment. It may help you to feel better and cope better with your disease and treatment.

Some examples of complementary therapies are acupuncture, herbal medicine, massage, yoga, and visualization. Controlled research trials have been conducted on these therapies … some work better than others for different things. For example, the Anxiety and Depression Association of American writes that yoga, which combines physical postures, breathing exercises, meditation, as well as other forms of regular physical exercise may help alleviate anxiety and depression.

An alternative therapy is generally used instead of conventional medical treatment. As noted by Cancer Research UK, all conventional cancer treatments have to go through rigorous testing by law in order to prove that they work, however alternative therapies have not been through such testing and there is no scientific evidence that they work. Some types of alternative therapy may not be completely safe and could cause harmful side effects.

In my career in the U.S. as a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, and especially over the past two years since moving to Cuenca, I’ve encountered people who delayed treatment for a number of acute conditions that could have been helped if they’d consulted a reputable doctor right from the start, including for broken bones, infections, back pain, diabetes, and gastrointestinal issues due to parasites and worse. In all cases, by delaying treatment to consult with “alternative” practitioners they worsened their conditions and required more extensive (and possibly expensive) follow-up treatment.

Quacks primarily target older adults, the health-conscious, those who are trying to stop the clock on aging, and sufferers of painful chronic diseases such as arthritis, cancer and AIDs. Intractable pain, desperation for relief, and worry about the cost of healthcare makes people that much more susceptible to quackery.

There is little regulation about what can be advertised and sold here in our community of Cuenca and for that matter, in the U.S.  I’ve written about a number of sketchy “cures” and protested publicly when I’ve seen health quackery advertised on various expat forums, including IV vitamin C, coffee enemas, “chelation therapy” and “natural, affordable cancer cures.” I feel an obligation to speak out, and will continue to do so. With evidence and an open mind.

Writing for the James Randi Educational Foundation, William M. London, professor of public health at California State University, Los Angeles, says, “Consumers have only the illusion of free choice when they are led to make decisions based on false or misleading information that comes with quackery. There is no health freedom in what is based upon misinformed consent. When you’re being deceived, you’re not free to choose. And when your health is threatened, it’s especially difficult to be wary of quackery.

“Health freedom” advocates expect health consumers to beware despite their disadvantageous bargaining position, but they don’t expect those offering products and services to be fully accountable to consumers. Caveat emptor is an important educational message for the James Randi Educational Foundation to offer, but it’s unreasonable to rely on caveat emptor without public policy based on the notion of caveat venditor (or caveat vendor): let the seller beware.”

I think when consumers stay educated, then there’s no market for quackery.

Have a healthy New Year, everyone.

Sources:

Cancer Research UK. The difference between complementary and alternative therapies. http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/cancers-in-general/treatment/complementary-alternative/about/the-difference-between-complementary-and-alternative-therapies

DrWeil.com. Is having a biomeridian stress test worthwhile? http://www.drweil.com/health-wellness/body-mind-spirit/stress-anxiety/is-having-a-biomeridian-stress-test-worthwhile/

James Randi Educational Foundation. Why I Oppose Quackery. http://web.randi.org/swift/why-i-oppose-quackery

National Council Against Health Fraud. Some Notes on Quackery. https://www.ncahf.org/articles/o-r/quackery.html

National Institute on Aging. Beware of Health Scams. https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/publication/beware-health-scams

Quackwatch.org. Quack “Electrodiagnostic” Devices. http://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/electro.html

ScienceBasedMedicine.org. Electrodermal Testing Part I: Fooling Patients with a Computerized Magic Eight Ball. https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/13926/

ScienceBasedMedicine.org. Electrodermal Testing Part II: Legal and Regulatory Aspects.

https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/electrodermal-testing-part-ii-legal-and-regulatory-aspects/

Wikipedia. Biofeedback. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biofeedback

_________________

Susan Burke March

Susan Burke March

Susan Burke March, a Cuenca expat, is a Registered and Licensed Dietitian, a Certified Diabetes Educator who specializes in smart solutions for weight loss and diabetes-related weight management. She is... Read More

  • Jerry Anderson

    As a biomedical engineer and expert witness in medical injuries, I have seen more than one example of what Susan is talking about. The machines which are touted to “diagnose” supposed illnesses in most cases are nothing more than empty boxes with flashing lights and impressive looking (to the non-technical) knobs and displays. If someone claims to be able to diagnose or cure a condition with their “special” machine, ask them for verification in the from of published test results in legitimate medical journals – they’ll put you off, because hey don’t exist. Welcome to technological “snake oil”!

    • StillWatching

      Right you are, Jerry. If I can’t duplicate in my lab what you claim to be able to do in yours, you are selling snake oil.

      Could somebody put that in terms that the True Believers will actually understand?

      • Gertie

        Still Watching, come out of the closet. You have a lot to say behind the anonymous label still watching.

  • libertarian1776

    Oh boy. You DO realize how many expats here are alternative medicine true believers, don’t you Susan?

    This is going to get interesting.

    Those legions whose ox you have quite legitimately gored are going to howl with unimaginable fervor at such apostasy. I’ll predict that your article receives more comments than David Morrill’s famous (infamous?) April Fool’s Day hoax.

    I’m going to grab my popcorn and pull up a chair to watch. This will be fun…

    • StillWatching

      In your usual articulate manner, you have really nailed this one. Let the fun begin as the dolts appear to squeal in protest with all their anecdotal examples of how wrong Susan is. After all, their cousin Jerry has a neighbor who knows a guy in Georgia that has a friend that knows someone that he heard from a reputable source that Greg Caton has developed a black salve that absolutely cures skin cancer. Caton will certainly come forth to give you a long winded account of how evil forces persecuted him and kidnapped him at the behest of “BIG PHARMA” (and other co-conspirators) to keep this cure from being sold to you, the poor, suffering public.

  • Carl Compton

    I can’t wait to see the comments on this one…

    • Ken

      Carl – I’d love to hear your comments on this one.
      I think I’d put this Article in Susan’s “TOP 10”
      She is a true asset to the Gringo Community of Cuenca and Ecuador.

    • Jodie

      Susan, you and I have had several conversations about alternative medicine. Since I have my Bachelors in alternative medicine I must disagree with what sounds to me like nothing except a doctor prescribing pills works. I know acupuncture works for many things including keeping me from severe pain due to a serious car accident. You and I have talked about the healing benefits of chicken soup. There are scammers everywhere, please do not discredit alternative and natural healing across the board. Used properly it is very effective.

      • Susan Schenck

        I heartily agree! The facts are found in the book The Truth About Cancer. What we call “conventional medicine” is only about 120 or so years old!!! What we call “alternative medicine” is the REAL medicine, USED FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS. Please get a copy of the book and see for yourself. Or read The Drug Story, free online. Then you will see that people were brainwashed by propaganda machines to believe in the quakery of drug medicine, which is ALWAYS TOXIC. Does it make sense to clean you house with dirt? Hello? Does it make sense to heal your body with toxic drugs????

        • Jason Faulkner

          Appeal to antiquity. It’s a logical fallacy. I’m sure you had no idea.

    • tocuencawithlove

      Thank you, first of all, dear Susan, for once again being the voice of reason! I do fear, however, for your physical safety in this city from now on, because I myself have experienced the fury and viciousness of people when exposing their “experts” as quacks. Please be careful and watch your back! I had the exact same thoughts you did when reading that recent GringoPost entry from the person looking for a “machine” to test her/him. I for one truly appreciate all of your articles and always look forward to reading them. I also enjoyed meeting you in person recently at the diabetes fair at Parque de la madre.

      • Hola! The Casa de la Diabetes is a wonderful non-profit organization dedicated to helping all people learn to manage their condition successfully. Their dream is to someday have a real “casa” where people can come, all ages, from little children just diagnosed with life-threatening type 1 diabetes, to elderly people dealing with complications, and everyone in between. They rely on donations and they are the most worthy of causes.

        And thanks for the comments on my columns! Thanks to CuencaHighLife.com for publishing them. <3

  • ‘Morning Jodie, Thanks for reading!

    In my column I write,” A complementary therapy means you can use it alongside your conventional medical treatment. It may help you to feel better and cope better with your disease and treatment.

    Some examples of complementary therapies are acupuncture, herbal medicine, massage, yoga, and visualization. Controlled research trials have been conducted on these therapies … some work better than others for different things.”

    • Nestor

      So you think Rx are superior to all herbal medicine? According to the Physicians Desk Reference all Rx have adverse effects. A diabetic friend being treated by a MD in the US, was recently advised by the diabetic nurse (RD) to enjoy jelly beans(!), almost 100% sugar, and how to adjust his insulin afterwards. The diet she gave him a year ago, would choke (kill) a horse! It is not what you would recommend, Susan.

  • Bruce Engle

    I very much enjoyed your article concerning alternative medicine, homeopathy, quackery, etc. Vilcabamba is filled with this stuff, and for that matter, even Cuenca to a lesser extent. I recently saw an acupuncture doctor making some claims that, to me at least, sounded outrageous, such as being able to detect cancer 10 years earlier than standard medical procedures.

    I am reminded of a roommate I had many years ago, a Chinese woman, whose mother lived in Hong Kong. Her mother became ill, and insisted on going to Chinese alternative medicine doctors for
    treatment. After many months of getting progressively worse, her family finally convinced her to see a standard medical doctor. The doctors told her she had cancer, and the type of cancer she had was very treatable and had a very high success rate. Unfortunately, she waited too long to come to a regular doctor, and the cancer had now metastasized to a stage where nothing could be done. Had she come to a medical doctor to begin with, the cancer could have been surgically removed, but that ship had sailed.

    A few months ago, while shopping at Walgreens in San Francisco, I spotted a medicine for curing leg cramps. Since I suffer from severe nocturnal leg cramps, this looked like just what I needed. While waiting in line at the cash register, I looked at the back of the box, and saw “Homeopathic treatment”. I immediately got out of the cash register line, and marched the box back to the shelf where I found it.

  • truehealthnow .

    One would have to assume that mainstream medicine is perfect and everything else is quackery after reading this. The fact is that there are many many thousands of people that are harmed by properly prescribed pharmaceutical medicine every year, not to mention all the cancer patients that have to suffer through chemo and radio therapy which has an overall success rate of < 5%. These 'approved therapies should be on the quack list because even medical doctors won't use them. Dr. Hamer is one of them and declared that none of the doctors he knew would either. He was an oncologist. http://www.newmedicine.ca/german-new-medicine.php

    • StillWatching

      It didn’t take long for the first “True Believer” to show up with their conspiracy nonsense. Every single word and implication of what truehealthnow has written has been debunked multiple times. Trouble is, no matter how many times it is debunked, True Believers never let go of the lies and they just keep trotting them out, again and agian, and it is impossible to keep up with them. They suck in sorry souls that need to believe in their nonsense and follow their misguided path at their own peril.

      • Susan Schenck

        From my decades of observation, it is the “magic pill” poppers whose path leads to perilous health….Death by Medicine, The Medical Mafia, and numerous books by other disillusioned MDs have examined this in detail. The real quakery is Big Pharma. But don’t take my word for it. Never! Do the research yourself. Plenty of it out there. Or take the drugs,and see how you feel!

        • StillWatching

          I have done the research but unlike you, I only accept science based information as actual research. All the crap you cite has been disproven multiple times, but no matter how many times I cite actual science debunking your nonsense, you keep trotting the same tired, incorrect nonsense at the next opportunity. You’re like Freddy Krueger and so is your nonsense.

          • Susan Schenck

            Again, what you call “science” is paid for by Big Pharma, like the fox guarding the hen. Read A Mind of Your Own, great expose on this issue. Cancer is NOT a “chemo deficiency.” Depression is NOT a “Prozac deficiency.”
            To be healthy takes work, not just popping pills.

            • Jason Faulkner

              Most studies are actually done by universities. BigPharma is just a hedge fund that comes in a buys up molecules that have already been proven.

              How many people come to you when they’re sick? Have you actually cured anyone of anything? You make a lot of claims that sound more like ideology than science.

        • StillWatching

          Hahahahahahahaha, Schenck upvoting herself twice. Once in her Schenck iteration and once as private1. What an ego.

          • Susan Schenck

            And you…..? No ego?

            • StillWatching

              Certainly not as big as yours. I don’t upvote my own posts as you do, nor do I create my own fictional characters to shill for myself and post phony upvotes as you have done with private1

    • Nestor

      Precisely my point, truehealthnow! In fact, the #1 cause of death in the US is not disease at all but iatrogenic (doctor caused), by prescription drugs in particular.

    • Susan Schenck

      I concur. Both my parents died of cancer and this led me down the rabbit hole. Research by doctors like Ralph Moss, MD (who has written MANY BOOKS exposing chemo) have proven that chemo kills only the cancer DAUGHTER CELLS, but not the STEM (mother) cells. WIthin five years, the cancer returns with a vengance!
      Yet, it is such big money, that ppl who cure cancer naturally (inexpensively and without toxic effects) are forced to leave the US. Some have even been murdered, about 60 last I counted. BIG PHARMA IS A MEDICAL MAFIA. This was a hard paradigm shift for me, as I was a doctor’s daughter. But people are waking up to the truth!

      • Ken

        60 Murders? Should probably link to that.
        (Be careful – I’m worried your going to run out of Capital Letters!) 🙂

        • Susan Schenck

          I put links above…of just a FEW of the links…..

      • StillWatching

        More Schench nonsense. As I have pointed out previously, no matter how many times you debunk this crap, the Tin Foil Hatters will drag it out and re-cite it anew at the next discussion. Read this and wait for the True Believers to squeal that this, too, is a conspiracy to hide the truth:

        https://www.quackwatch.org/04ConsumerEducation/Reviews/moss.html

        • Greg Caton

          Are you aware that Tim Bollen did an expose concerning Stephen Barrett, Mr. Quackwatch himself, who admitted in a sworn deposition that he was paid by pharmaceutical companies to libel alternative medicine? I’ll bet not. His statements as it relates to my particular field were so provably and ridiculously false, that I wrote an extensive essay to point out its many errors in 2009 :

          http://www.altcancer.net/docs/quack/eschar.htm

          If you do ANY work of substance in the medical field that does not profit Big Pharma, you can expect to end up on Quackwatch. Among alternative practitioners, ending up on Quackwatch is a badge of honor.

          In fact, my business picked up enormously after Barrett started targeting me. I really wish he’d write MORE unprovable crap about me!

          • StillWatching

            As an introduction to the rest of my reply, below, I will post the following information that is readily available on the internet here:

            http://www.fda.gov/downloads/ICECI/UCM091477.pdf

            You can search the internet yourself to read of the criminality of Greg Caton, but be advised that Caton knows how to manipulate search results so that most of the negative stuff about him is buried under layers of self promoting trash that mostly whines about how he was kidnapped and persecuted by the FDA. The excerpt below tells the real story. It is from The Office of Criminal Investigations
            In Fiscal Year 2004, the efforts of FDA’s Office of Criminal Investigations (OCI) and resulted in 356 arrests and 188 convictions.
            ______________________________________________________________

            Unapproved New Drugs Sold as Treatment for Cancer
            ________________________________________________
            This investigation was initiated based on information regarding the illegal activities of a food
            processing plant called Lumen Food Corporation, located in Lake Charles, Louisiana. Lumen
            Food Corporation advertised products via an Internet website http://www.altcancer.com under the
            name of Alpha Omega Labs, located in Nassau, Bahamas. These products were advertised as
            containing medicinal qualities for the treatment of cancer and many other diseases.
            From 1999 to 2003, Gregory Caton, President of Lumen Food Corporation, and his
            employees utilized Alpha Omega Labs to take direct orders for these unapproved new drugs.
            The chemical substances were not approved for sale by FDA. As a result of the scheme,
            Caton received approximately $950,000. In order to legally market a drug in interstate
            commerce, the drug’s manufacturer is required to comply with all applicable provisions of
            the Act in order to ensure that the products sold are safe for humans and effective for their
            intended uses.
            On at least two occasions known to FDA, the items shipped by Caton’s firm and used by
            consumers resulted in bodily injury and harm. The products were Cansema Tonic III and
            H3O. Cansema Tonic III was advertised for use in the cure, mitigation, treatment or
            prevention of cancer. H3O was advertised for use in the cure, mitigation, treatment, or
            prevention of athlete’s foot, cuts and burns, eczema, fingernail fungus, chronic gas,
            gastroenteritis, gingivitis and periodontal disease, halitosis, herpes sores, ophthalmia,
            psoriasis, sore throat, strep throat and wounds. Caton did not have an IND application on file
            with FDA.
            On September 17, 2003, a federal search warrant was executed at Caton’s residence, Lumen
            Food Corporation, and an industrial site owned by Caton. All of these locations were in Lake
            Charles, Louisiana.
            During the search of Caton’s residence, a cache of weapons were found consisting of 3 semiautomatic
            rifles, 1 bolt action rifle, 2 shotguns, a semi-automatic pistol, 10/252 rounds of
            amunition, 3 body armor vests, 1 leg armor and 2 bullet resistant helmets. The weapons,
            armor and ammunition were found concealed in a hidden compartment that was inside a
            closet. Caton was arrested on possession of firearms by a convicted felon.
            26
            Office of Criminal Investigations Fiscal Year 2004
            ______________________________________________________________________________
            Numerous misbranded and unapproved new drugs were seized during the search at Lumen
            Food Corporation, as well as items deemed as hazardous materials by chemical engineers.
            Also seized were 16/55 gallon drums of a liquid corrosive material at the industrial site
            owned by Caton. This liquid was subsequently identified as sulfuric acid and was mislabeled
            as non-corrosive. All of the hazardous materials seized were subsequently destroyed by a
            hazardous materials disposal company.
            On May 26, 2004, Caton was convicted of violating Title 18 U.S.C. 1341 – Mail Fraud; and
            Title 21 U.S.C. 331(d), 355(a) and 333(a)(2) – Introduction into Interstate Commerce of
            Unapproved New Drugs. Caton also forfeited 2 buildings and his residence in Lake Charles,
            Louisiana.
            On August 24, 2004, Caton was sentenced to 33 months incarceration to be followed by 3
            years supervised release.
            This was a joint investigation with the Lake Charles and Westlake Police Departments.

      • StillWatching

        Ms. Ego upvoting herself again, twice. Nice work, Schenck

      • Devon_Nullman

        Deaths will continue to rise now that the HAARP station has been shut down. Most rational people already knew that HAARP could cause hurricanes and earthquakes, but very few knew about setting “B-7-L-5” which can direct healing electromagnetic waves to blanket areas of approximately 57 square kilometers at a time.

  • Katherine Farago

    As a long time student of “natural medicine”, i find those trained in allopathic methods have little interest in learning about methods that were very effective prior to synthetic pharmaceuticals that give the body multiple side effects that require more pharmaceuticals to resolve the side effects or the cut and burn methodology……..not that those are not useful at times……….not to mention that the long term success of chemo is about 2% over 5 years and actually causes cancers to reappear (in the literature………..one can look it up).

    • Ken

      “One” can look it up? Where? Your 2% number is fully inaccurate.
      http://www.cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@research/documents/document/acspc-042801.pdf

    • Ken
      • Susan Schenck

        Or one can talk to the numerous people healed by Gerson therapy….healed without trashing their immune system, as chemo does. I can count on one hand (with fingers to spare!) the number of ppl I know who lived beyond 5 years after chemo “therapy,” the ingredients which are derived from chemical warfare agents.

        • Ken

          No matter how much science or randomized double-blind studies I pile up on your desk – I’m certain I will not change your mind, but take a look at one of the many 1000’s of articles disputing & debunking the “Gerson Therapy or Diet”
          https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/the-not-so-beautiful-untruth-about-the-gerson-therapy-and-cancer-quackery/

          • Susan Schenck

            Perhaps you are not aware, but much of the so-called “science based medicine” is ghost written and fabricated with imaginary drug studies. Kelly Brogan, MD exposes this in her bestseller, A Mind of Your Own. This is another great expose on the medical mafia that is supposed to have “valid cures.” It is fake science at its best. Read her book.

            • StillWatching

              I read this on the internet so it must be true: “Kelly Brogan was paid $3,458,022.93 to write that “bestseller” and she has since recanted every word of it, saying her fee was paid for by Dr. Mercola and The Health Ranger”

              • Greg Caton

                Recanted every word? Really?
                How interesting. I guess I’m just dreaming when I read that she promotes it on her personal website:

                http://kellybroganmd.com/amindofyourown/

                No wait. It’s okay to change the definition of “recant” to mean “actively support,” right?

            • Devon_Nullman

              “Kelly Brogan, MD exposes this in her bestseller” – That’s an absurd statement.

              Try something like this:

              https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9816009

              Oh I forgot, NIH is in cahoots with Big Pharma and the Bilderberg Group to suppress all miraculous cancer cures. Never mind.

        • StillWatching

          Debunked already

          • Susan Schenck

            debunked by Big Pharma with their pseudoscience, no doubt. They are grasping at straws as Americans are finding gentler ways to heal.

        • Jason Faulkner

          I worked (briefly) at the Gerson clinic in Tijuana when I was straight out of medical school. You’re being duped. the place was a deathtrap (Coretta Scott King died there before the government shut it down). People went there as a last resort after every other treatment had failed and Gerson’s daughter (who ran it after his death) was more than happy to suck the last few dollars out of them before they passed. This isn’t something I read, this is something I saw with my own two eyes when I was just a young physician starting his career. Clinics like Gerson’s used to be everywhere along the border and they all made the same claims. What Gerson never did was actually publish any data (though he spent the last 30 years of his career promising to do so). People like Gerson are self-deluded in some cases, straight up con men in others (like Brzezinski), but in the end the one thing they never provide is evidence. When they are finally called to task for bilking people out of their last dollar for nothing, they fallback on the old trope of a “government conspiracy” to silence them.

        • Greg Caton

          Susan . . . you can talk ’till your blue in the face and you won’t convince these people that the problem with cancer patients is that they’re chemotherapy and radiation deficient !!!

          We would all do SO much better if we’d only take Ken, StillWatching, and Ms. March at their word that we need MORE TOXINS !!! More indiscriminate killers of cells !!!

          And while we’re at it, we need prayer vigils to seek divine intervention for more chemtrails, more GMO foods, more glyphosates and other dangerous, untested, agricultural “rescue chemistry,” . . . but most of all, more chemtherapy, radiation, radical invasive surgery, and more pharmaceutical drugs with hideous side effects !!!

        • Devon_Nullman

          Currently used Alkylating chemotherapeutic agents are so far removed from compounds like Mustard Gas that your comment about that is meaningless. Look here at the chemical structure: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sulfur_mustard

          Then look at the structure of Bendamustine, a currently used Alkylating agent:
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bendamustine

          Or, just ignore this, which is what I am pretty sure you will do.

    • StillWatching

      More pure crap. This is exactly the nonsense that I say has been debunked uncountable times yet still is trotted out by the Vilcabamba kooks. Here, just for the hell of it, I’ll give you some links that you will ignore (after all, you are a True Believer and will only read stuff that feeds your scanning biases) but real truth seekers may care to read:

      http://www.snopes.com/chemotherapy-doctor-blows-the-whistle/

      https://anaximperator.wordpress.com/2009/09/02/only-3-percent-survive-chemotherapy/

      https://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/cancer.html

      https://hatepseudoscience.com/2014/04/02/confronting-cancer-quackery/

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1295952/pdf/jrsocmed00050-0009.pdf

      http://skepdic.com/naturalcures.html

      https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/chris-beat-cancer/

      http://www.quackometer.net/blog/2012/06/false-hope-4-cancer.html

  • LadyMoon

    My first thought after reading this sane and sensible article was “and…they’re off!” I think the usual suspects will be weighing in soon. From what scientific study are the comments “5% cure rate on cancer”? I believe it is far higher than that. Thank you Susan….

    • libertarian1776

      Twenty-one comments already and as I write this the true believers are probably just now finishing up their morning coffee enemas.

      I’ve got plenty of pop corn and lots of lawn chairs, Lady Moon. Come on over and enjoy the show, watching the carnival barkers hawking their snake oil treatments and focusing the energy of the universe on their Vitamin C infusions.

  • StillWatching

    Susan has published a lot of great stuff, but this one takes the prize for boldness and addresses the greatest need. I do hope it deeply offends those that truly need to be offended. I understand ambulances are on the way to Vilcabamba as I write…

  • StillWatching

    You need to re-read the article, but this time read it for comprehension, not just to look for things that offend you. You have completely misinterpreted what Susan has written.

    • Nestor

      Nope, I think you missed my point Still Watching. Just because it’s not alternative medicine doesn’t make it good either – a lot of conventional medicine worsens conditions and even kills.

      • StillWatching

        Nestor, assuming you are responding to my reply to Jodie I take absolutely no issue with your point. I’ve certainly seen my share of terrible Western Medicine, but it isn’t institutionalized as you seem to be implying. Bad outcomes happen for many different reasons, not the least of which is individual incompetence. I wouldn’t seek treatment from the kid that graduated last in my class but on the whole, because Western Medicine is subject to constant refinement through peer review, good practitioners adapt accordingly. My gripe and Susan’s as well, is with institutionalized quackery as is found in so much alternative “medicine”. I have cited many of these in the links I’ve provided. I hope you take the time to read them and not just look for information from quack sources that will just feed your scanning biases.

        Here is a link to a site that will give you a SHORT list of websites to avoid because they rely on nothing more than quackery and pseudo science. This list is by no means complete, but if you are being informed by any of these sites, you are being horribly misinformed:

        https://skeptoid.com/episodes/4283

  • StillWatching

    Some people may not understand references to Vilcabamba and for those that don’t get it, let me explain. For whatever reason, Vilcabamba seems to have attracted an inordinate number of kooks that subscribe to every bit of quackery under the sun. This also manifests itself as belief in some of the most outrageous conspiracy theories in existence. They include, but are certainly not limited to things such as this:

    The JFK Assassination
    9/11 Cover-Up
    Area 51 and the Aliens
    Paul Is Dead
    Secret Societies Control the World
    The Moon Landings Were Faked
    Jesus and Mary Magdalene
    Holocaust Revisionism
    The CIA and AIDS
    The Reptilian Elite
    Rods of God caused the earthquake in Ecuador

    In short, Vilcabamba is a metaphor for all that is ridiculous, unproven, unprovable, pseudo-scientific nonsense.

    • BDev

      Hail Vilcabamba!

  • BDev

    My favorite debunked(?) therapy is the Placebo. It an amazingly broad spectrum therapy, useful for all sorts of conditions. Try it!

    • StillWatching

      It works best for True Believers. It is not debunked and has been clinically demonstrated many times and reported in peer reviewed journals such as Lancet:

      For many years, placebos have been defined by their inert content and their use as controls in clinical trials and treatments in clinical practice. Recent research shows that placebo effects are genuine psychobiological events attributable to the overall therapeutic context, and that these effects can be robust in both laboratory and clinical settings. There is also evidence that placebo effects can exist in clinical practice, even if no placebo is given. Further promotion and integration of laboratory and clinical research will allow advances in the ethical use of placebo mechanisms that are inherent in routine clinical care, and encourage the use of treatments that stimulate placebo effects.

      http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(09)61706-2/abstract?cc=y=

      • BDev

        Hooray for the Placebo! Subjective, irrational, unscientific medicine at its best!
        Oh wait… mind-body effects are quackery….

    • Susan Schenck

      EXACTLY. Read The Placebo Effect by Dr. Joe Dispenza to fully understand the power of placebo!

      • Jason Faulkner

        There is no placebo effect, only a placebo perception. Whether it’s the duration of an illness, your rang of motion in a given joint, the resolution of an infection, nothing you can actually measure is affected by placebo.

    • Jason Faulkner

      Placebo has not been shown to have any effect on any objectively measurable endpoint. The only thing placebo affects is one’s perception.

  • Jerry Anderson

    Stillwatching et al, I don’t happen to have any cousins in GA, but do have a friend whose cousin in Tennessee had a 3rd grade education in the Appalachians who is convinced the hooch he makes in his backyard still cures all manner of major illnesses. Or does it just make them unaware they a deathly ill after a few swigs?

    • StillWatching

      Comic relief is most welcome.

  • BDev

    Nice to see all the anti-quackery guards standing at the ready to defend their Kingdom, it’s King, and their Bible!
    Impressive…

  • Dora R.

    Not defending the use of quackery in any way, shape, or form. However, for thousands of years mankind avoided modern day diseases without drugs, surgery, and modern modalities of medics, chiefly by fresh, whole foods, exercise (hard work and walking), fresh air, adequate sleep, and peace with his fellowman and Maker.

    • Ken

      However – Cancer has probably been around for as long as there has been multicellular life!
      Average life expectancy in the US for white males at birth: 1850-38.3, 1900-48.2, 1950-66.3, 2000-74.8.
      Maybe those “Modern Day Diseases” are good for us! 🙂 Because we know these increases couldn’t possibly have anything to do with Modern Medicine!

      • Marcelle

        When I told my US internist I had noticed a decided difference at each decade of life for the worse, he responded: “You are correct…Half our patients die between 50 and 60 years old, and the other half between 60 and 70 years of age. Don’t believe the so-called stats regarding extended life in the day in which we live compared with the turn of the last century. It’s poppycock! And it pays well.” If you think about it, with all the processed non-foods, envirotoxins, bad water, chronic stress, etc., people cannot be living much longer now than then. Countless diseases exist now that were unheard of then.

        • StillWatching

          Holy crap, another great new conspiracy for the Vilcabamba crowd. Yup, all the stats showing life expectancies have increased over time are just part of a huge conspiracy to make you…

          Fill in your own blank. It won’t matter. There is no reasoning with the Tin Foil Hat Crowd. When is your next meeting?

        • Ken

          Do I understand your comment to say all the life expectancy data collected over time is false?

    • Jeff Van Pelt

      “Mankind avoided modern day diseases”? Do you know how many people in Europe the bubonic plague killed, or how many indigenous Americans smallpox and other diseases killed? The life span was much shorter in years before modern medicine.

      • StillWatching

        Bravo. The voice of reason has shown up.

      • BDev

        “The life span was much shorter in years before clean water and basic sanitation.”
        There. Fixed it for ya.

      • Devon_Nullman

        It was not Bubonic Plague or Smallpox, it was chemtrails that killed all those people, and there is no antidote for the ingredients of chemtrails ((5,10,15,20-tetrakis(alpha,alpha,alpha-2-pivalamidophenyl)porphyrin)

        • StillWatching

          Mr. Nullman, PLEASE! The educated among us realize you are a great purveyor of sarcastic humor and wit, but the dolts we are trying to reach may take you literally. If you respond with the same great humor, all you will do is confirm for the dolts that you are being serious.

    • StillWatching

      Pure nonsense and myth. Here is a chart of life expectancies over the ages. What do you suppose was causing the average lifespan in the paleolithic age to be 33 years, while it rose to 67.2 (worldwide average) in 2010? Hint: Developments in nutrition and modern medicine.

      Era Life expectancy at birth in years

      Paleolithic 33
      Neolithic 20
      Bronze Age and Iron Age 26
      Classical Greece 28
      Classical Greece, another estimate 25
      Classical Rome 20–30
      Pre-Columbian North America 25–30
      Medieval Islamic Caliphate 35+
      Late medieval English peerage 30
      Early Modern England 33–40
      1900 world average 31
      1950 world average 48
      2010 world average 67.2

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_expectancy

      • Greg Caton

        Hahaha . . . as if Wikipedia were a reliable and impartial source of information. None of this comports with the twenty years of study that was done by Weston Price M.D., before penning “Nutrition and Physical Degeneration” (1939).

    • Susan Schenck

      EXACTLY! And don’t forget sunshine! Vitamin D has in fact been known to prevent cancer.

      • StillWatching

        Yes, but snake oil is 93.459% more effective.

      • StillWatching

        Schenck upvoting herself as private1 again.

        • Susan Schenck

          Again I am NOT private 1 and at least I am using my real name, which you are NOT.

      • Devon_Nullman

        What exactly does that mean when something “has been known” to do something ? Is that a phrase you use when submitting research for review ?

    • LadyMoon

      My mouth flew open on this one. Please state one factual reference for your claims. It’s clearly BS! Just one little piece of evidence…about half the men to apply for the army after Pearl Harbor were denied because of their state of health (or lack thereof). Cancer has been around for thousands of years. How about the plague? Smallpox? Polio? Know your history, my friend.

    • Jason Faulkner

      “for thousands of years mankind avoided modern day diseases without
      drugs, surgery, and modern modalities of medics, chiefly by fresh, whole
      foods, exercise (hard work and walking), fresh air, adequate sleep, and
      peace with his fellowman and Maker”

      And they lived to a ripe old age of dead in childbirth.

      Human life expectancy has never been longer and human health-related quality of life has never been better than it is right now (and it will only get better). It’s why mankind has worked so hard over the past century to come up with medicine in the first place.

  • lmizono

    Wow, this is like discussing politics! Trying to make one side right or wrong is like being in the washing machine. It is up to each person to choose their own method of healing via their own intuition and hopefully to be proactive when it comes to their own bodies. The mind plays a huge role in the healing process and the body has amazing autonomous healing capacities which tend to be downplayed or completely ignored.

    • StillWatching

      Yes, and it also helps to incant utterances such as “OM, Namaste and Oh wow” under your energy pyramid as you hold your crystals and hope for the best

    • Jeff Van Pelt

      I’ll take scientific evidence over intuition.

      • BDev

        Why limit yourself?

        • StillWatching

          To weed out nonsense, obviously.

    • Susan Schenck

      When you injure yourself, does the body not heal itself? OF COURSE THE BODY IS ITS OWN HEALER. It helps if you give it the proper NUTRIENTS it needs. It helps if you give it natural, nontoxic healing therapies like energy work. But drugs? Drugs are TOXINS. TOXINS MAKE YOU SICKER.

      • Jason Faulkner

        Most diseases will resolve on their own with no medical intervention whatsoever. A huge part of medical interventions is to prevent long-term morbidity. Strep throat will definitely go away on its own, but left untreated it can cause rheumatic fever and ultimately destroy your heart valves. A broke arm will heal, but left untreated it will leave you disabled and deformed. On and on it goes.

        BTW, I don’t think you understand the definition of toxin.

  • Jeff Van Pelt

    Thanks for the excellent article on an important topic. I like the Red Flags of Quackery, and I have one to add: Someone who lists themselves as “Dr. so-and-so” but doesn’t state the degree, where they got it, or what subject it is in. It could be a doctor of theology or a useless Ph.D. from an online diploma mill, for all the reader knows.

  • StillWatching

    Nestor, why do you cite anecdotal evidence that proves nothing other than individual stupidity, assuming the anecdote is true?

    • Donald

      That would be “its”, not “it’s” (it is). And “iteration” generally refers to the repetition of mathematical or computational procedures applied to the results of previous procedures or applications in order to get closer and closer to the solution of a given problem. An iteration can also refer to a new version of a piece of computer hardware or software. The phrase we probably want regarding the PDR is “in its current version/edition/volume/ publication/printing”. Even those who know how to write can make an occasional mistake. 🙂 I certainly do. 🙂

  • StillWatching

    BDev, you’re the only rational voice I’ve ever heard from Vilcabamba. I’m sure there are others, but man, you must get lonely down there.

    • BDev

      Who you callin’ rational, kemosabe?! 😉
      I’d never consider myself rational or scientific, or go to bat for ’em, though I find use for that POV sometimes. Couldn’t stomach the limited identity or label. Far more fun to play with the rational, the irrational and the arational, as needs dictate.

      It’s kinda like the First Law of Scientific Objectivity: There ain’t none. But yeah, it can be very captivating to pretend the Big O exists somewhere, somehow… we just have to keep looking…

      • StillWatching

        I like you better when you’re rational.

  • Susan Schenck

    Those of you who want to SINCERELY know who THE REAL QUACKS are need to get to the truth and read the NYT bestseller, THE TRUTH ABOUT CANCER.This book, more than ANY of the THOUSANDS of health books I have read, gives the accurate history of the current medical model used in the USA. Many of you here will be VERY SHOCKED to learn the truth.

    • Ken
      • StillWatching

        Damn, beat me to it, but you are so gentle. I’m not. The book Schenck is pushing is pure bullshit. So is Ty Bollinger. Your link is fine, but here is another:

        http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2016/04/19/another-young-woman-with-cancer-lured-into-quackery-by-ty-bollinger/

        If you want something more comprehensive, check this:

        https://integrativeoncology-essentials.com/2015/11/alternative-medicine-gurus-are-misleading-cancer-patients/

        • Susan Schenck

          It has 66 studies, the vast majority of them PUBLISHED IN SCIENTIFIC JOURNALS. If anyone would like the PDF of these science chapters, I will gladly email it to them. Just put LFF REQUEST in the subject headline. LiveFoodFactor@yahoo.com

          • Jason Faulkner

            But you said all the scientific studies are rigged.

            • StillWatching

              faulkner, how dare you confront schenck about her hypocrisy? She’s not used to that and you could be introducing toxins into her system that could require a ketogenic, high raw diet to cure.

      • Susan Schenck

        Why not come to my class and learn something?

        • StillWatching

          We can get all the quackery we need right here in the comfort of our own home and we don’t even have to pay you for it.

          At your class, do you also upvote yourself to feed your ego as you have done throughout this series of comments?

          • Susan Schenck

            I will give you a free class.

            • StillWatching

              Susan, thank you for your magnanimous offer, but you surely can’t believe that the issue is the money. My time is far too valuable to spend traveling to listen to your nonsense. After all, I am preoccupied here debunking all the nonsense you promulgate online.

      • StillWatching

        She’s right up there with Mercola when it comes to quackery.

        • Susan Schenck

          THAT, my friend, IS A COMPLEMENT!!! THANK YOU VERY MUCH.

          • StillWatching

            Of all the rotten things I may be, your friend, is certainly not one of them.

      • Susan Schenck

        Come to my class. You might learn a thing or two!

    • private1

      The book is factually correct and accurate. Very good read.

      • Ken

        The author, Ty Bollinger, was an accountant and bodybuilder, untrained in science or medicine.

        • Susan Schenck

          Watch his videos. He interviews doctors and experts. He is a researcher, not a doctor. And his work is factual and correct.

          • StillWatching

            What a strange coincidence. Same verbiage as private1. Why is that, Ms. Upvoteyourself?

          • StillWatching

            How ironic. You claim he “interviews doctors”. Aren’t they the guys you are always dismissing as quacks and shills for big pharma? Experts? You mean people that have read “Beyond Broccoli”?

        • Susan Schenck

          And….? You have a problem with the above? Sure makes sense to me, after decades of observation, studying, and improving my own health. So you really think UNnatural is best? And to take toxic drugs is best? While in acupuncture college, we had an entire class on the Physician’s Desk Reference. Read up on your drugs before taking them. Then come back and tell me they are HEALING you.

          • StillWatching

            An Entire class? Really? Wow, that must have been really in depth.

            STRAW MAN ARGUMENT
            You misrepresented someone’s argument to make it easier to attack.

            By exaggerating, misrepresenting, or just completely fabricating someone’s argument, it’s much easier to present your own position as being reasonable, but this kind of dishonesty serves to undermine honest rational debate.

            Example: After Ken said that we should put more money into health and education, Schenck responded by saying that she was surprised that Ken hates our country so much that he wants to leave it defenseless by cutting military spending.

            • Susan Schenck

              What? I never said that.

              • StillWatching

                It’s called a metaphor. Really, you can’t be that dense. In your previous post you mischaracterized what Ken posted, so I pointed out that you had raised a Straw Man Argument. I then gave an example of a straw man argument as a metaphor for what you had done. Capiche?

      • StillWatching

        Shills like you are laughable, but dangerous. I’m sure you have the science background to state “The book is factually correct and accurate”. Perhaps you have a Bachelors Degree in Alternative Medicine.

        • private1

          Apparently, you are one of the educated who thinks every time you MUST see an MD it is because you have a drug deficiency and need More drugs. You are a true intellectual indeed!

          • StillWatching

            Another Straw Man argument

            • Katherine Farago

              wow —- a real live troll. you of course realize that most “double blind studies” are fixed to match the result the pharmaceutical company desires. you also fit into my original statement which is that some allopathically trained individuals do not have the capacity to have open minds. when all the antibiotics have failed for a loved one………..and your only last ditch effort is vitamin C……..clearly you wouldn’t bother.

              Listen to the whole Truth about cancer series which is available on the internet………..periodically free ……..and open your mind.

              • StillWatching

                “most “double blind studies” are fixed to match the result the pharmaceutical company desires.”

                Yeah, fer sure, dude. I read that on the internet once so it must be true. ‘ceptin’ I heard that ALL double blind studies are fixed by those BIG PHARMA devils. In accordance with Agenda 21 and the New World Order, they are out to kill all their customers just to push their population control agenda. I haven’t figured out yet how they’re going to stay in business after everyone is dead, but I’m headed down to Vilca tomorrow to see if those good people can give me some ideas.

              • StillWatching

                “most “double blind studies” are fixed to match the result the pharmaceutical company desires.”

                Yeah, fer sure, dude. I read that on the internet once so it must be true. ‘ceptin’ I heard that ALL double blind studies are fixed by those BIG PHARMA devils. In accordance with Agenda 21 and the New World Order, they are out to kill all their customers just to push their population control agenda. I haven’t figured out yet how they’re going to stay in business after everyone is dead, but I’m headed down to Vilca tomorrow to see if those good people can give me some ideas.

      • StillWatching

        private1 is a shill that just now signed up to Disqus. This is her only appearance. It is actually Susan Schenck in a new iteration, shilling for herself.

        • private1

          you are incorrect in your assumption. At least you are consistent!

        • Susan Schenck

          NOT TRUE. At least I have the guts to use my real name.

    • StillWatching

      Schenck, seriously, stop upvoting yourself in ANY iteration. It is tacky.

    • StillWatching

      For those that may be unaware, to see who is upvoting any post, just place your cursor on the ^ character after each post. You will see Schenck repeatedly upvoting herself, both as “Susan Schenck” and as “private1” which is a character she created yesterday to pump her own posts. What an ego.

  • Ja

    At this point my suggestion to all those who have experienced the healing power of natural medicine is to simple boycot Susans articles and her attack dogs who’s sole purpose is to discredit anyone with personal experiences that contradict Susan. Let them have their drugs and chemo. Within the next generations their methods will be looked at like blood letting. Only problem is we feel for all those they are misleading now. The editor of Cuencahighlife should have used more discression because this article has offended many good people!

    • StillWatching

      OH NOOOOOOOO, not a boycott. Anything but that! How will we ever get along without you here? My only hope is that this article and the comments that follow it DO offend those that we intend to offend. If science, facts, logic and reason offend you, good.

      Please don’t let the door hit your collective asses on he way out.

    • StillWatching

      Schenck has upvoted you twice. That’s pretty much like getting an endorsement from a lunatic.

      • Susan Schenck

        Rant and rave all you want. I know those pharmaceuticals are making you cranky, and I FORGIVE YOU.

    • Jason Faulkner

      Bloodletting was a natural treatment.

      Being offended does not afford you any special rights.

      • Ja

        Bloodletting is and was in no way natural. Where would you come up with that? It was pushed by the so called authorities of the time just like drugs, chemo and radiation are today’s. What special rights do you feel I am asking for? Being treated with common respect and thoughtfulness like all people should be afforded is not a special treatment, its call courtesy. It’s the same old thing in all Susans posts concerning alternative treatments, she tries to discredit them in any way she can, and then her attack dogs in the comments section attack anyone who comes forward with personal experience that contradict Susan agenda. So real personal experiences are throw out the window and those good people are berated, defamed and calls all kind of names so these thoughtless idiots can make their pseudo intellectual narcissistic egos feel they have won something. It is the height of ignorance when someone refuse to at least listen to the personal experiences of those trying to share and help. It’s really a waste of time because they have no intention of trying to understand, they only want to attack. Sad indeed! Jason I am not directing this at you. Your comments are not offensive, I am commenting on those who attacks others in this tread. Funny thing is we have read and seen the out come of modern medicine and know it does not cure in most cases, but these folks refuse to even listen to those who have real life experience of healing by natural ways because they want to continue to believe their own way only. Refusing to listen to those who have lived through it is just plain purposeful ignorance.

  • Susan Schenck

    You should really educate yourself more on this topic. A great book is The Drug Story. It was a bestseller and went into some 9 printings when it first came out. Here is a free synopsis:
    http://educate-yourself.org/fc/drugstory.shtml

    • StillWatching

      More debunked quackery:

      Morris Bealle was a newspaper editor who got caught in the conflict between advertisers and the public good. This gave him a new slant on the idea of a “free press,” a press that was free to print any advertisement that would pay his bills.

      Bealle took to attacking the AMA—and Morris Fishbein in particular—with some nasty insinuations. Beware the wrath of a quack, especially one like Bealle who is big on conspiracy theories while avoiding the specific concerns of critics: does this product provide a safe and effective solution as advertised?

      All you ever cite is pseudo-science garbage and no matter how many times we debunk it, you resurrect it.

  • Dan

    Am I the only noticing that only a dozen or so people are participating in this conversation? For all the sound and fury of the comments, the topic is drawing a big yawn from the overall expat community. On the other hand, it’s good that the zealots have somewhere to channel their anger.

    • Terry Chiles

      With the amazing ability to utilize the internet to find information on almost every subject known to man, it is even more amazing that people utilizing computers can be so very ignorant of search capabilities… I do believe the weakest link in human evolution is that ignorance does not manifest itself as chronic or sudden pain, despite often resulting in death. When you do searches, be objective, look for facts, don’t just look to find support for your beliefs.

      • StillWatching

        That sounds like sage advice to me. Truth seekers will generally look for both (or multiple) sides to issues instead of just feeding their scanning biases. The reasons for that should be axiomatic, but never seem to be. Perhaps I can proffer and example to make my point.

        Decades ago, when I was a grad student, I discovered an interest in and a passion for libertarian thought and Austrian School economics. In addition to the reading I did by authors such as Ludwig von Mises, Frédéric Bastiat, Milton Friedman, et al, I also read a hell of a lot of socialist and communist literature by the likes of Karl Marx, Frederich Engles, Robert Owen, Paul Krugman and Joseph Stiglitz. My friends couldn’t understand why I was reading so much that they considered to be anathema to libertarian/Austrian School thought. I explained to them that if I didn’t know what such people were actually saying instead of what denigrators said they were saying, I could never fully debunk anything I thought to be untrue.

        Thus it is with the pseudo-scientific stuff that those like Susan Schenck present here. I have actually read the material they provide links to and I hope that gives me a modicum of credibility when I dismiss it. I hope it doesn’t go unnoticed, but I try to provide links to scientific literature that disproves the pseudo-scientific material they present. I realize that most of the vocal proponents of pseudo-science won’t read what I present because it doesn’t feed their scanning biases. All those people want to do is confirm their already held beliefs. However, every once in a while, an actual truth seeker will come along and it is those people I am hoping to reach.

        • Susan Schenck

          And you have no beliefs? And you think the “science” of big pharma is REAL? Nonsense. But again, I will say, if you want drugs, USE THEM. Then come back and tell me how they worked. The real test is in the proof of the pudding.

        • libertarian1776

          StillWatching: You said, “Decades ago…I discovered an interest in
          and a passion for libertarian thought and Austrian School economics. In addition to the reading I did by authors such as Ludwig von Mises, Frédéric Bastiat, Milton Friedman, et al, I also read a hell of a lot of socialist and communist literature…My friends couldn’t understand why I was reading so much that they considered to be anathema to libertarian/Austrian School thought. I explained to them that if I didn’t know what such people were actually saying instead of what denigrators said they were saying, I could never fully debunk anything I thought to be untrue.”

          Ah, a man after my own heart.

          Thanks for carrying the ball in the current battle of ideas. After my opening comments I opted to avoid the fray, knowing that there is absolutely nothing you can say to true believers to change their minds.

          Regrettably, I find that the same is true with religion and politics as
          well. Facts only confuse those who find comfort in their own delusional
          beliefs and don’t want to be troubled by having to think for themselves or to constantly question the validity of their convictions.

          Like you, I still try my best to read and listen to opposing viewpoints,
          e.g., the Washington Post, NY Times, Wall Street Journal, CNN, Fox News, etc., but lately it is becoming really difficult to watch completely irresponsible so-called journalists parroting back propaganda fed to them like pabulum from government officials.

          Quoting George Orwell, “All political thinking for years past has been vitiated in the same way. People can foresee the future only when it coincides with their own wishes, and the most grossly obvious facts can be ignored when
          they are unwelcome.”

          Happy New Year, SW. I have a feeling it’s going to be a very interesting one…

          • StillWatching

            Happy New Year to you, too, Libertarian. It has been obvious to me for quite a while that we are kindred souls. Another such critical thinker is BDev, who I obviously don’t agree with on every issue, but whom I always respect for his intelligence, articulateness and sense of humor. He, too, is a libertarian and maybe even a Libertarian. I have always noted that a prerequisite for a sense of humor is innate intelligence but have you noticed that there don’t seem to be many ignorant libertarians?

            Your Orwell quote reminds me of the words of George F. Will who said something like this: “Intellectual rigor annoys most people because it interferes with the joy they take from allowing their wishes to be the father of their thoughts.”

          • Devon_Nullman

            From “The Boxer” – Simon & Garfunkle:

            I am just a poor boy
            Though my story’s seldom told
            I have squandered my resistance
            For a pocket full of mumbles, such are promises
            All lies and jests
            Still a man hears what he wants to hear
            And disregards the rest

    • StillWatching

      Dan, why would you conflate the number of people commenting with the overall apathy of the expat community regarding what is written? After all, until your comment, you hadn’t opined either, yet you obviously read this far. Do you think, perhaps that other may have done like yourself and become better informed, but didn’t feel it necessary to comment?

      As I write this, 1,168 people have read this article and ostensibly, some may have also read these comments. Wouldn’t that put to rest your premise about the apathy of the expat community?

  • LadyMoon

    Wait. What? I thought popcorn would kill you….and I’d miss all this fun! LOL

  • Ja

    StillWatching, your blovious tirades prove my point perfectly! What a inconsiderate moron. Intellect does not make you wise, and you certainly prove that saying. You will get what you deserve in the end because of your thoughtless narcissistic ignorance. Nothing more than an obvious lapdog attacking with no consideration for the experiences and feelings of others. Go back in your hole where you belong. Funny how you use the same Disqus to hide yourself as the poster you accuse, incorrectly. Your despot is infantile. Enough said

    • StillWatching

      Whaaaaaa, whaaaaa, whaaaaa

      Stop whining. It is terribly puerile. See if you can focus long enough to pay attention to the substance of what I write. I don’t give a rats ass if you don’t like the form, but you would do well to learn from the content. The essence of what I write boils down to this; I have a complete lack of respect for those that promulgate lies and dangerous misinformation and rely on pseudoscience and quackery to inform themselves. Clearly, you are such a person.

      By the way, your stilted writing sucks. Stop using a thesaurus to sound erudite because you are a failure in that regard. “Your despot is infantile” has no meaning and “blovious” is apparently your own bastardization of the word “bloviate”. Do you also turn nouns into verbs? Do you “parent”? I suppose your pseudo-intellectual writing goes well with your belief in pseudo-science and anecdotal evidence.

    • Susan Schenck

      The drugs are making him very irritable.:-)

  • BDev

    🙂
    What is SW like when irrational?
    I bet you’d be even more fun and playful than you already are…!

    • StillWatching

      Nah, I’m just as acerbic then as I am when I’m rational. I admit to taking perverse pleasure in offending those I don’t respect.

  • mizonol

    I can speak from first hand experience that Greg Caton’s black salve as well as his other products I have used absolutely work. Greg is also more knowledgable about the human body than any medical doctor I have ever known. It’s sad that people cannot open their minds enough to see that there are many paths to healing.

    • StillWatching

      Thank you so much for setting me straight. Please send me a link to the double blind studies of Caton’s black salve, that have been published in peer reviewed journals. I will be happy to read them thoroughly and tell you my thoughts.

      As for this statement: “Greg is also more knowledgable about the human body than any medical doctor I have ever known.” Do tell me your basis for knowing Greg’s knowledge is valid as well as the number of medical doctors you have actually known. Please be honest with me. Is the number greater than 20? If not, all you are doing is reporting worthless anecdotal evidence to support your position and that is my gripe with all True Believers in pseudo-science.

      If I can’t reproduce the results Caton claims for his black salve in my lab, then the stuff just doesn’t pass scientific scrutiny and thinking people will always dismiss it as snake oil.

      • Susan Schenck
      • Greg Caton

        In Meditopia, I site a study with over 4,000 cancer patients that was done in the 1850’s at Middlesex Hospital in London, at that time one of those prestigious hospitals in the world, that was so impressive that their formulas, precursors to my own, were announced as legitimate cancer cures. Not treatments. Cures.

        StillWatching — I don’t know who you are, because unlike myself in such matters, you don’t use your real name, but you are no scientist, and like Ms. March, you certainly have no commitment to “evidence-based medicine.”

        If you did, you would know that most clinical studies now used to acquire drug approval are rigged — so says the former editors of Lancet and the New England Journal of Medicine. See :

        http://www.altcancer.net/ashwin/ashw0615.htm

        BTW . . . I have made two previous attempts to post to this page, and CuencaHighLife and both of them were nixed. If this goes through, it will be the first. We’ll see . . . Ohhh, God save me! Another conspiracy theory !!!!!

        • Jason Faulkner

          Large, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial or it didn’t happen.

          • Greg Caton

            It was a large, double-blind study, and without all the cheating that is now commonplace. Read Chapter 2 of Meditopia, where I talk about it. A free-read at : http://www.meditopia.org

            Your inference that I would just make this up, when I’ve written numerous articles on this subject and am a leading authority on escharotic preparations and their place in medical history, is nauseating.

            • Jason Faulkner

              None of your links worked but I managed to track down the book you keep referring to on Google.

              https://archive.org/details/b20397628

              I’m not sure if you really believe what you’re saying or just trying to keep your hustle going. Do you know what a large, double-blind, placebo controlled study even is? Not only is this book nothing of the sort, the author doesn’t understand even the most basic precepts of cancer. He went so far to compare it to syphilis. I guess that’s understandable since this was published just around the same time germ theory was being proposed and nearly a decade before even the first bacteria had been actually discovered.

              The little bit of data that is presented are nothing but case presentations. No sample size to speak of and therefore no statistical analysis, no randomization, no placebo group, no blinding. It is almost but not completely unlike a scientific study. It’s a classic case of a physician presenting random cases where a disease resolved and hiding all the cases where the patient died as expected. About 2% of ANY disease will resolve spontaneously. It’s what charlatans and the clergy have relied on for centuries. The author isn’t even aware that cancer is not a single disease. Every case is presented as if they were the same pathology. Again, not holding anything against him. In 1850 all physicians had been trained in Galenic vitalism, a thoroughly debunked theoretical framework that is still used as the basis for most SCAM modalities. They had no idea how the body worked beyond the few breakthroughs made in the days of Vesalius (the heart being a pump and blood vessels being how blood is carried around, etc.).

              You claim you have a product that can treat a disease. Then do a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study and prove it. Stop conning desperate people out of their few remaining dollars with your snakeoil pitch.

      • lmizono

        I was merely sharing my personal experience. I am not reliant on studies, but rather my own intuition. I have known WAY more than 20 medical doctors in my lifetime.
        The things that Greg has told me have actually come true and I have gotten positive results from his suggestions. Most important of all, his perspectives resonate with my own intuition. On the other hand, just one example of many, medical doctors prescribed a couple drugs that nearly killed my mother until her intuition kicked in telling her to stop all her meds. After a tiny bit of research, I found that all of her symptoms were indeed drug related. She was perfect within a short period of time. Were the docs not aware of the side effects of the drugs they were prescribing? Obviously not. It is quite evident we have polar opposite views and never the twain shall meet. Mine has worked beautifully for me my entire life and I assume yours has too. Peace be with you.

    • Susan Schenck

      Oncologists have bought these herbs from him. Greg asked, “Is this for your patients?” They replied that they would LOSE THEIR LICENSES IF THEY USED IT ON PATIENTS. No, it was for themselves or their family.

      • Jason Faulkner

        Completely made-up anecdote.

    • Jason Faulkner

      Greg is a well known con artist and recidivist convicted felon. His products have failed to show any efficacy in the treatment or prevention of any disease.

      • Greg Caton

        Once again, you’d have to take the time to read the extant literature on this subject, and it is obvious you will not. Instead, your just reach for whatever pejorative seems handy and convenient.

    • StillWatching

      Please go to the following site and scroll to page 26 to learn all you need to know about Greg Caton and his phony cancer cure:

      http://www.fda.gov/downloads/ICECI/UCM091477.pdf

  • BDev

    Nah. Not for me. Intuition, when used, refined and optimized (as best one is able, and in appropriate circumstances) provides very fascinating and useful insights and connections in one’s life that otherwise would be easily overlooked, or dismissed as ‘irrational’. I consider it arational. Intuition is probably right up there with Placebo in its profound effects; i.e. very significant.

    It all comes down to one’s deepest perspective of life: Am I running my life, or does something greater ultimately steer my ship? Opening up to that latter awareness yields amazing and profoundly fulfilling events and adventures that would otherwise not be perceived. If the limited, insecure ego seizes command and subdues all manner of other perceptive capabilities, that will certainly deliver a moderately fulfilling lifestyle, of sorts. But I experience and value other perceptive qualities as well. They provide a far richer variety of experience for me. Where this is especially surprising and fun are the endless unexpected connections and synchronicities that occur. All miraculous and beautiful.

    • StillWatching

      I don’t dismiss the intuition of others, I just recognize its lack in myself and therefore am relegated to reliance on science to supply me with my reality.

      • BDev

        Yes, that’s cool. As I mentioned, a science-filled rationally-oriented life is a fine one, no doubt. That sense of command and precision is wonderful. And it flows inexorably towards greater and greater understanding; more and more complex invention. There is great joy in the mindful investigation of the universe, and the jewels of discovery are exhilarating and endless. I thrill at all the state-of-the-art discoveries I peruse every day on the net.
        Carry on, brother!

      • BDev

        (I tried to reply to above but it never showed up… and I’ve already forgotten most of what I said! So I’ll just add this:)
        That’s cool. To each his own. Whatever POV and lifestyle you choose is excellent. Max it out, and max out the best character traits you can in yourself. I’d say that’s all that matters.

        • StillWatching

          I have no idea why the delay, but it appears that your post has now shown up. I am well familiar with the frustration you allude to of composing what you think is the perfect response, only to have it lost in cyberspace, knowing you will never re-capture the full beauty of the original iteration. I’m glad you are a kindred soul in that regard but I am even more pleased to see what you wrote originally.

  • StillWatching

    I believe you. Hahahahahahaha

    • private1

      for the official record…..I’m in Florida….have been for 29 years. So, as I stated, you are wrong in your assumption however you are consistent.

      • StillWatching

        Tell us the truth. When did schenck call or e-mail you and ask you to shill for her?

      • StillWatching

        That would certainly explain why you never posted a single comment here until schenck created you 2 days ago.

  • Susan Schenck

    Try taking poisonous, toxic drugs for yourself if you REALLY believe they will HEAL you. Read the Physician’s Desk Reference and see that for many, the side effects are worse than the disease. THEY DO NOT HEAL. THEY SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES. If you want to use them, you are free to. But watch your health diminish. I have observed all my life the difference between people who use drugs and those who use natural (ANCIENT!) healing methods. My father was an MD and the drugs killed him. He bypassed a healthy lifestyle, thinking these would work, and HE DIED.
    Again, THE DRUGS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES.

    • StillWatching

      More anecdotal evidence that supports absolutely no valid conclusion. Will you ever understand that is one reason those of us who believe in science, not pseudo-science, dismiss you so easily?

      As for the PDR, all you do is make me laugh. You clowns refer to it as if you actually have “read” it, although it is not a book for reading, but referring to. thus, Physicians Desk REFERENCE. Back before they were available online, I had the new yearly edition sitting on my desk for longer than you could spell “broccoli”. The 69th edition was 2,500 pages long, thus not only did you never read it, you never even lifted one with your puny arms (yeah, I’ve seen your pictures)

      Please, Ms. Schneck, you are way out of your league here. You can’t bluff me and I’m sure most other informed readers see right through you as well.

    • StillWatching

      Upvoted by none other than Schenck in drag

    • Ken

      Dear Ms. Schenck – Would you mind sharing a few names of those cancer patients you have cured with your Raw Food Cooking Classes and your “Natural Affordable Cancer Cures” that you advertise weekly? That would easily put all these debates to rest.

  • Devon_Nullman

    My friends, have you felt your manly vigor waning? Have you experienced shaky nerves or sexual debility? Fear not! A cure is at hand. Experience the restorative virtues of Dr. Nullman’s electric belt, guaranteed to enliven the elements of manhood and make the bodily organs strong, vigorous, and free of pain.

  • Devon_Nullman

    I personally think that the most gullible people are the most desperate people. When doctors tell you that there is nothing more they can do for your cancer, or that your autistic child will not get better, etc – you become desperate, and the quacks and charlatans will be waiting.

  • StillWatching

    Anyone can go to your profile and see that schenck just created you 2 days ago.

  • Teresa Lightfoot

    Whoa… Thank you Susan for (bravely) delineating the common foibles of seeking treatment from unproven sources. Now can we all say ‘Happy New Year!’?

  • StillWatching

    This is when I like you most. You write very lucidly and I appreciate your intelligence.

  • Ken

    Greg Caton – are you not the same Caton who is a convicted felon, who was sentenced in 2004 to 33 months in prison for weapons possession, defrauding customers and violating FDA regulations in relation to alternative health products?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greg_Caton

    http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Greg_Caton

    And more recently from England:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/11628065/The-fake-cancer-cure-conference-the-healers-tried-to-keep-secret.html

    • Greg Caton

      Ken . . . I know it would be a lot to ask for someone to get their facts straight instead of mindlessly coming on the comment boards to firebomb people whose opinions differ from your own . . . but bear with me.

      First of all, I have never been to the UK, let alone been a participant in the conference you reference above. Secondly, many, if not the majority, of the truly great medical geniuses of the 20th century were prosecuted by the U.S., and they include virtually all of my medical heroes over the past century: Dr. R.R. Rife, Dr. William F. Koch, Harry Hoxsey, Dr. Wilhelm Reich, Dr. Stanislaw Burzynski — (my wife was one of his lab technicians in the early 90’s) — to same a few.

      In the summer of 2004, I wrote to Dr. H C Moolenburgh in the Netherlands to laud his book, “As Chance Would Have It,” never expecting a response. A month later I got a very personal letter from him referencing my case, reminding me that all contributions of significance in medicine meet with opposition, often violently, by those whose profits, privileges, and prejudices are challenged. It wasn’t that long ago that Dr. Ignaz Semmelwise was institutionalized for professing that less patients would die at the hands of surgeons if they would simply wash their hands before going into the surgical room. We accept this today as a given.

      You and Ms. March can do all you want to protect a dying, corrupt, evil and incorrigibly inept system. But facts are a stubborn thing, and as Thomas S. Kuhn so brilliantly articulated in “The Structure of Scientific Revolutions,” there are no provably false scientific models that escape the dustbin of history — no matter how much money they make for pharmaceutical companies and no matter how many armies of apologists, yourself included, are sent out to protect them.

      So enjoy flaming while you can.
      The system you protect is soon coming to an end.

      LASTLY . . . although you cite my issues with the FDA, nobody of your ilk adds that the Ecuadorian government formally condemned the actions of the U.S. government in my case as legally without foundation and had my residency reinstated — see :

      http://www.meditopia.org/chap3-3.htm

      But since facts have no meaning in your world, I’m sure you’ll continue to leave that out.

      • Jason Faulkner

        Semmelweis was not committed to an institution “for professing that less patients would die at the hands of surgeons if
        they would simply wash their hands before going into the surgical room.” He was committed due to his unruly behavior and rampant alcohol abuse late in his life. Based on the historical descriptions, it would appear he was suffering from tertiary syphillis, a common ailment among obstetricians in the era before antibiotics.

        Facts have plenty of meaning, but facts are not opinions. They are facts. Cries of persecution are the hallmark of a charlatan. Why do you not do a proper study to prove your hypothesis? Why is 80% of your web page a rant about some grand conspiracy on the part of physicians to make money? It would be one thing had you dedicated so many years of your life working for free (like I have), but you are in fact a businessman who pleaded guilty to defrauding his customers. Defrauding, meaning you didn’t even do business, you just had a sales pitch good enough to talk people out of their money for nothing.

        Do a study. Prove me wrong.

  • Jason Faulkner

    Great article. Just wanted to point out one omission:

    “The phrases “complementary therapy” and “alternative therapy” are often
    used as if they mean the same thing, sometimes combined into one phrase –
    complementary and alternative therapies (CAMs).”

    We often refer to them as SCAMs, the “S” being for supplements.

    I have seen too many patients delay treatment because they were pulled in by these scam artists. Steve Jobs actually had a completely operable case of cancer when he was diagnosed. He chose to forgo the standard treatment and opted for “alternative” treatment instead. 8 months later when it was clear it wasn’t working, he returned to his oncologist only learn the cancer had metastasized throughout his body and the only option left was palliative care.

    I try to explain to my patients, there is no such thing as “alternative” medicine. Any medicine that works is called medicine. I’m afraid there really is no legislation or system to control this problem in Ecuador. I’m often left aghast at the health claims I see advertised on SCAM products here. Mexico passed legislation about 6 years ago outlawing “tratamientos milagros” (miracle treatments) and started cracking down on false advertising in the media and in the streets. It has had some impact. A lot of bogus clinics were shut down and a lot of SCAM stores were put out of business. Hopefully Ecuador will get to a point that we can start doing the same. There’s nothing more frustrating than seeing a patient return after 6 months with blood sugars in the 300s and systolic pressures over 200 because their sister/cousin/friend told them about some herb/vitamin/homeopathic nonsense that would work better.

  • Jason Faulkner

    Censoring news stories that you do not agree with is not being treated with common respect and thoughtfulness. Susan didn’t berate, defame or call you names. She published a story that you then called for the public to boycott.

    And bloodletting is just as natural as acupuncture and equally ineffective in the treatment of any disease.

  • StillWatching

    You fool, wikipedia cites other sources, just as it has in this case and if you’re not discerning enough to read them, that tells me all I need to know about you.

  • StillWatching

    Lord, you are dumb. Obviously (to most) I was mocking those that accept anything they read on the internet as factual and if the specificity of my dollar figure didn’t give that away, you need to get out more. That doesn’t change the underlying point that Kelly Brogan is as full of crap as you are.

  • StillWatching

    Poor, poor persecuted Greg Caton. Same tired story trotted out, just as you did when you were sent to prison. It gets old after a while. As for your nonsense about Tim Bolen, of course I’m aware of it because every alternative medicine quack trots out those lies every time Stephen Barrett debunks some of their nonsense. As I always say about schenck, no matter how many times your stuff is debunked, you just trot it out again at the next opportunity, knowing that most people will believe you if they are already disposed to your quackery and the others won’t check. So, here we go again with a few links that contradict your nonsense:

    http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2010/07/27/a-nonsensical-attack-stephen-barrett/

    http://www.ratbags.com/rsoles/comment/timoranter.htm

    There are many other sites completely debunking your crap and I know you know that because you use the internet all the time to feed your own scanning bias. Anybody that knows how to use google or google scholar, however, can seek out the truth for themself.

  • Devon_Nullman

    One of my pet peeves are people that state that something that is beneficial must be naturally occurring and that anything made in a factory is probably toxic. The shame is that, as I said earlier, people that have been told that their disease is incurable, or will be difficult to control are desperate and the crooks and charlatans have adapted well to using the internet as an efficient method to spot these potential customers. Examples:

    http://www.mms-supplement.com/
    http://cdautism.org/

    Chlorine Dioxide as a treatment – Wow

    • Jason Faulkner

      It’s called the naturalistic fallacy. Sometimes I think the purpose of these arguments is to bombard one with so many logical fallacies that it becomes too tedious to even counter them one by one, the idea being that the one who hangs in with the discussion the longest wins. It’s a shame the education system is so poor at teaching science. Regardless of one’s knowledge of the minutia of a given scientific field, logic should be as understood as arithmetic by the time one finishes grade school. I’m amazed how many grown adults don’t seem to understand even the basic precepts of a logical argument.

      • StillWatching

        “Sometimes I think the purpose of these arguments is to bombard one with so many logical fallacies that it becomes too tedious to even counter them one by one, the idea being that the one who hangs in with the discussion the longest wins”

        The absolute master of this is Greg Caton, who will bury anyone willing to play in his sandbox with more empty words than even the most patient soul could follow. schenck is an amateur compared to Caton.

  • StillWatching

    You seem incapable of grasping the difference between anecdotal evidence and that which science demands———– the ability to duplicate results before valid conclusions can be made. The case of your mother is a perfect example of this. You conflate coincidence with causality and until you understand this concept, having a meaningful conversation with you (or schenck or Caton, for that matter) is impossible.

  • StillWatching

    Yup, that is a well respected, peer reviewed journal you have cited.

    Folks, all Caton cites is stuff that even the uninformed can see through if they actually go to the site he links to.

    Caton, even you have to admit that citing your own publication is tacky and disingenuous.

    • Greg Caton

      I don’t have a publication.

      I post pages on our sites, and those pages quote from other authoritative sources. What is wrong with you?

      There is an excellent description of the process and its effectiveness for the unintiated in : “Skin Cancer : The Officlal Organ of the Portuguese Association of Skin Cancer, Volume 23, Number, October / December, 2008.

      You won’t read it, of course, but it is an excellent professional primer on how the process works.

      http://www.altcancer.net/docs/skin_cancer_goncalves_2008.pdf

  • Jason Faulkner

    The plural of anecdotes is anecdote, not data. Anyone with as much to gain as you would have taken the time to collect their data and publish real findings if there really was anything there. Providing nothing but case testimonials buttressed by cries of persecution is the hallmark of a charlatan.

  • StillWatching

    Pure crap, Caton. You don’t cite actual scientific literature. The links you provide aren’t to respected peer reviewed journals, they are to your own blogs and anybody can see this if they actually click on your links.

  • Jason Faulkner

    An appeal to antiquity is nauseating. I would no sooner rely on a single study from 160 years ago to make treatment decisions in the 21st century than I would rely on a 19th century physician for medical advice. You’ve been in this business how many decades? Do the work if you have something to prove. Spare me the links to editorials and books. Peer review or it’s bollocks.

  • Jason Faulkner

    Ignorance? I can say with confidence that I know more about REAL WORLD human physiology and pharmacology than a charlatan invoking outdated Galenic vitalist nonsense like you. I don’t need to take the time to rebut your links one at a time because you’ve already been thoroughly exposed by people even more qualified than me. In matters involving the health of my patients and the public in general, the only language spoken here is the scientific. method. If you makes claims that are not supported by well run, repeatable studies with strict adherence to the scientific method, you’re nothing but a con man sucking money from desperate people and you should feel bad. Sadly, the hallmark of a sociopath is they can’t feel bad about what they do. It’s what makes them sociopaths in the first place.

  • StillWatching

    Donald, thank you for your correction of “it’s” vs “its” You are of course correct and I have made the proper edit.

    However, regarding the use of “iteration”, I think we both know (as I sense you are quite articulate) that another meaning of the word is this:

    “version, incarnation ”

    https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/iteration

    Look at definition 3

    I’m happy to discuss pedantic issues with anyone that is gracious enough to take the time to correct me. Like you, I make many errors and am always grateful to those that point them out.

    • Donald

      Hi Still: I suspected that you would not agree on “iteration”. I only found it as “repeated mathematical or computer procedures”. It seemed to be mostly pertaining to mathematical or electronic things like operating systems, as in your example above. It didn’t seem to mean in the sense of simply the latest version of some printed publication. I still do not think that “the latest “iteration” of the PDR” is the best that we can do. Of course, I dismiss Merriam-Webster as hopelessly outdated or misguided when it disagrees with me or shows me to be wrong, as in this case. You will have to do better than Merriam-Webster as your source. Incarnation is a good word. I had not thought of that. Anyway, nice to talk to you.

  • Jason Faulkner

    I followed your link. Still don’t see what study you are referring to. How about you just post a link to the study and spare me all the conspiracy nonsense?

  • StillWatching

    There isn’t an iota of difference between you and schenck when it comes to citing and re-citing information that has been debunked, ad nauseam. Your belief that youtube is a peer reviewed journal is laughable. You may fool the ignorant, but never the educated.

  • StillWatching

    Hi Donald, Thanks for writing again. “Iteration” has been in my lexicon in the way I used it for decades and the truth is, that until you brought the issue up, I had no idea that the prevalent use of the word is as you represent it.

    I have always been in love with words and it goes back to the time I was a kid and we had a standard volume of Miriam Websters in the bathroom and I would sit there reading it all the time. Naturally, as a kid with a limited vocabulary, I would often come across definitions of words which themselves contained other words that I didn’t recognize and I’d have to cross reference them, which I never failed to do. This habit followed me right through college and grad school, where I essentially learned all about science and medicine long before I studied both formally.

    As a kid we also had and enormous volume sitting on my dad’s desk that was purchased in installments at the local A&P grocery store. I recall that the first installment was 59 cents and receipts for so many dollars worth of other purchases at the store, and succeeding installments were 99 cents with a purchase. I looked forward to unwrapping each installment and adding to the existing volume, which had 3 metal posts through which the holes in the new pages had to be aligned. When the tome was finished, it was about 18 inches thick and if there was a word in English, it was in that volume.

    Now, in this fabulous age of computers and the internet, I don’t even have a hard copy dictionary (yes, somewhat blasphemous, wouldn’t you say?) but I use this link frequently:

    http://www.onelook.com/?w=iteration&ls=a

    Of course, I have included the specific query for the word “iteration” with it but if you go to it you can bookmark it for yourself. In the instant case you will see that the result returns links to 25 different on-line dictionaries and it is a most useful tool. As just one example, here is the link I have chosen for the American Heritage Dictionary for the word “iteration”.

    https://www.ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=iteration

    There you will see this definition of the word:

    it·er·a·tion (ĭt′ə-rāshən)

    n.
    1. The act or an instance of iterating; repetition.
    2. A form, adaption, or version of something: the latest iteration of a popular app.
    3. Mathematics A computational procedure in which a cycle of operations is repeated, often to approximate the desired result more closely.
    4. Computers
    a. The process of repeating a set of instructions a specified number of times or until a specific result is achieved.
    b. One cycle of a set of instructions to be repeated: After ten iterations, the program exited the loop.

    While we’re on the subject of modern marvels that enhance education, I will share with you one of my greatest tools. I’m sure you are aware that there are search engines of many iterations (sorry, I couldn’t resist) but one you may not be aware of is Google Scholar. Like most people, I use the regular google when I am looking for things I want to share with laymen, but when I’m looking for something where all I care about are scientific or scholarly references, I use this:

    https://scholar.google.com.ec/

    When I’m searching for specific results from various scholarly journals, this is the only option that makes sense. Try it and tell me what you think.

    Finally, as to your suggestion for using “incarnation” instead of “iteration” while it may serve the purpose, it just doesn’t work for me because it seems too stilted. It just ain’t me. At my age I tend to stick with what I know and “iteration” will just have to do for now.

  • Devon_Nullman

    What an odd, unrelated thing to say. Please explain your comment.

  • Devon_Nullman

    What University is that degree from ?

  • Jason Faulkner

    No, he won’t because every link you post gives a 404 error. Can’t figure out how to post a link to your own propaganda but people are supposed to trust you for health advice? What was your degree again? An Associates in what? Why not just tell people you’re an airline pilot and you can fly them to wherever they want to go? I understand that it was fraud, your honor, but I really believed I could fly a plane and I didn’t mean to hurt anyone.

  • mizonol

    ‘Stillwatching’, I did a bit of investigating and it seems you have a number of different aliases. I’d just like to know how many of them are participating in this discussion?

    • StillWatching

      All of them.