Where to eat? You have plenty of choices

May 15, 2017 | 21 comments

By Edd and Cynthia Staton

I woke up Sunday to a rainy morning, the perfect setting to bake those chocolate chip cookies I talked about in my last post. Sunday’s are the one quiet day in our neighborhood — no sounds of traffic or construction. Sawing, hammering, and banging somewhere within earshot have been, like the street noise five floors below, an almost constant part of our life here for seven years. So much so that we rarely even notice it any more.

The racket recently has come from two soon-to-open restaurants — one next door and the other right across the street. It’s hard to believe that when we moved to this apartment almost seven years ago there was a total of only two restaurants on the entire street!

Flash forward to now. Counting the two under construction (and a third a couple of minutes up the street) we now have twelve. A block away are three more, and on the street another block up we can choose from another ten. With full lunches as inexpensive as $2.75 each, no wonder we don’t cook very much any more!

This explosion of the culinary scene isn’t confined to just our neighborhood. New restaurants are popping up so quickly all over town that we literally can’t keep up any more. Friends will ask, “Have you tried so and so?” and we’re like, “Tried it? We’ve never even heard of it.”

Are all the new expats in town fueling this movement? Hardly. Given that we represent less than 1% of Cuenca’s population, our numbers don’t influence much of anything.

With the proliferation of dining options in the States it’s probably hard for you to imagine that the whole concept of eating out is relatively new here. When we arrived in 2010 locals often went to a restaurant with their families after Mass on Sunday, and almuerzos (fixed menu lunches) have been a staple of the culture forever. Other than that a special occasion meal in a nice hotel was pretty much all there was.

Since then, the downturn in the global economy sent home thousands Cuencanos who were living abroad in the U.S. and Spain. They brought back with them the experience of casual dining, and many of them had in fact worked in all types of different restaurants.

That knowledge plus the money saved after years abroad is the driving force behind the growing food scene in Cuenca. Italian has traditionally dominated the international dining market, but lately Mexican seems to be all the rage. In the “old days” there was one Mexican restaurant downtown and another tucked into a remote neighborhood near the airport. Now we have five within a fifteen minute walk of our home!

Keeping it real, quantity and quality don’t go hand in hand. For instance, we’ve yet to taste food that reminds us of the burritos and enchiladas we enjoyed back in the States. And Cynthia’s marinara sauce tops anything we’ve been served in a restaurant.

But convenience sometimes tops flavor. Case in point — we’re about to walk up the street for one of those $2.75 almuerzos. What’s on the menu today? No idea. With a glass of fresh-squeezed juice, a big bowl of homemade soup and an entree of beef, chicken, or pork plus a big pile of rice it will be filling and nutritious.

And if I get hungry later there’s a tempting platter of cookies waiting for me in the kitchen.

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