Ecuador News

Correists can’t campaign against referendum

The faction of Alianza País loyal to former president Rafael Correa will not be able to legally oppose the seven questions on President Lenin Moreno’s referendum. The referendum election is scheduled for Sunday, February 4.

Correists can’t campaign against referendum
President Lenin Moreno

The National Electoral Council (CNE), the organization that monitors elections and distributes public campaign funding, only recognizes the Alianza País faction of the party that supports Moreno. In November, the CNE refused to ratify Correista officer election results which replaced Moreno with Ricardo Patiña as AP president.

Of the 17 national political parties and movements registered by CNE, 14 have said they plan to support all seven questions on the referendum. Among those parties are Crea, Suma, and the Democratic Left, parties that opposed Moreno in the May elections.

The CRE said campaigning for the referendum election will begin January 3 and end on February 1, three days ahead of the vote. The council said it would invite 110 international observers to oversee the election, including a delegation from the European Union.

According to the CRE, the election budget is $48.3 million.

  • Galileo

    What are the 7 questions?

    • Jason Faulkner

      5 of the questions have broad support across the political spectrum and could have been passed in the Assembly 6 months ago. Those are the window dressing. There are really only 2 questions.

      One would repeal the the amendment allowing for reelection. That was under review by the Constitutional Court because the Constitution does not allow for a referendum on amendments that would take away an individual’s rights. In this case, the amicus arguments stated that the amendment would take away the right of an individual citizen to run for elected office and take away the right of the electorate to choose any candidate they wish, thereby making it unconstitutional. Leaked information indicated that a majority of the justices agreed. The vote was scheduled for yesterday but Moreno bypassed the court under the excuse that he could no longer wait for the court. The president of the court cancelled the vote late Friday evening without giving any cause only hours after a meeting with two representatives from Moreno’s office. So much for judicial independence.

      The other question gives the president the right to appoint a committee unilaterally and without any legislative oversight. This committee would be empowered to override legislative actions, appoint and fire judges and replace national and provincial officials at will. Basically everyone in all branches of government are now at the whim of the executive. These powers are currently granted to the legislature alone. The Constitutional Court would have struck it down but Moreno bypassed them, again because he was in a hurry. After the referendum, all these powers will be handed over to this committee who answers to nobody except the president.

      And you wonder why I say most people can’t be trusted with the vote. Don’t expect to hear any arguments against this referendum in the media. The newspapers and television networks are all in lock step behind this. The coup is underway and you’re all willing participants.

      But Correa is against it so it must be good, right?

      Democracy restored.

    • Michael Berger

      I don’t understand one of the questions but here are the remaining six:

      &iquest Should the mere accusation of corruption or money laundering be sufficient to allow the government to steal the property of anyone who is unable to prove his or her innocence and ban that person from public office permanently? NO

      &iquest Should Rafael Correa be prohibited by law from ever being president again? YES and he should also be prohibited from being vice president

      &iquest Would you like to remove the statute of limitations for sexual crimes against children and adolescents, make a token gesture to fight a problem that will continue to be ignored, allow Ecuador an opportunity to virtue signal, synchronize Ecuadorian law to United Nations guidelines that ignore biological reality and pretend that 16 and 17 year olds are children and therefore restrict natural human sexual activity at the point of a gun, while continuing to ignore crimes against actual children? NO

      &iquest Do you agree that only Ecuador’s government may exploit natural resources and create environmental damage by mining and that valuable lands should be made near worthless to their owners so that the government can buy them for pennies on the dollar to reach their stated goal of taking even more land out of private hands only to re-zone them later for exploitation and to slip in a law that could make it illegal to cut down trees on your own land? NO

      &iquest Do you agree that it is theft to charge people a 75% tax on “profits” when they sell a property since any supposed “gain” disappears the moment they go to purchase another property at tomorrow’s prices and eliminate this double taxation since taxes were already paid on the money when it was originally earned? YES

      &iquest Do you agree that 740 acres of the earth’s lungs should be destroyed and contaminated to temporarily satisfy China’s thirst for oil and gas instead of 3210 acres being destroyed and that 123,500 acres of communally owned indigenous land should pass into the hands of the government for future exploitation, and that the environment be destroyed under the pretext of protecting it? FU

  • Michael Berger

    Of the 17 national political parties and movements registered by CNE, 14 have said they plan to support all seven questions on the referendum.

    Typical slave mentality, supporting 100% of what is proposed by government based on the desire to go along and get along rather than as a result of thought, reason, and principle.

    • Joe Tana

      No it’s called democracy. The free will to do what you want and believe in so go back to Correa and tell him he is no longer the the president of Ecuador. He is a citizen and cast his vote just like all the other citizens of Ecuador.

      • Jason Faulkner

        And the citizens of Ecuador can cast their vote . . . as long as it’s not for Correa.

        You haven’t actually read the questions, have you?

        • Michael Berger

          I also got the impression that Joe did not read the questions. You have pointed out a fundamental flaw in democracy; the majority of people don’t know what the seven questions are about and will not even understand most of them when it comes time to vote. All they will know is that Moreno wants all seven questions answered with a yes and if they do so Correa will never be allowed to be president in Ecuador again.

          I agree that most of the questions are filler and are only there to camouflage the real purpose for the consulta popular but since the filler questions also have enormous consequences I think they should be understood and considered seriously by everyone. These are individual questions and to have some movements advocating voting yes on all seven and others advocating no on all seven is lazy and irresponsible. It suggests that even though today we have the technology for direct democracy, the citizenry as a whole have dumbed themselves down so much that they are like little children and lack the capacity for self rule.

      • Michael Berger

        It’s good that they are having the vote and restoring the constitutional term limits so that Correa can never again be president; pretty much everyone is in agreement with that, myself included. The problem is with some of the other questions that have nothing to do with Correa being president.

        • Jason Faulkner

          If pretty much everyone is in agreement, they wouldn’t need to ban the largest political party in the country from campaigning, would they?

          People are in agreement because they haven’t discussed the issues. They’ll remain in agreement because the media is in lock-step with Moreno and the Constitutional Court has been bypassed, effectively muzzling any serious discussion of the issues.

          Meanwhile, nearly every developed country on the planet does not have term limits and nobody claims they need their democracy restored.

  • Jason Faulkner

    And there you have it. Democracy restored.